Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

One company is having a hard time capturing U.S. regulators: Facebook. It's the subject of federal criminal investigation in New York, and is reportedly facing a record multi-billion-dollar fine from the Federal Trade Commission for violating its users' privacy.

The latest: An NBC News investigation has found that Facebook would regularly barter its users' privacy, opening up its treasured proprietary datasets to its most valuable partners, while denying them to potential rivals.

  • Regulators want to find Mark Zuckerberg personally liable, reports the Washington Post, rather than simply levying a large fine on the company. (In the context of what Wired calls "15 Months of Fresh Hell Inside Facebook," a 10-figure fine at the corporate level would hardly cause Zuckerberg to raise a sweat.)
  • Zuckerberg has accepted personal responsibility for Facebook's failings in speeches and in Congressional testimony, but Facebook is reportedly pushing back hard on attempts to get him to personally certify that his company is adhering to agreed privacy practices.

What we’re seeing: Facebook recently announced the departure of Erskine Bowles from its board of directors, noting that he has "served on the board since 2011". Bowles famously grilled Zuckerberg over how he allowed Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

  • Trump supporter Peter Thiel, who has sat on Facebook's board since 2005, remains there, despite attempts to remove him. Thiel, a multibillionaire, owns just $5 million of Facebook stock; Zuckerberg has said it would be "crazy" to remove him from the board.

The bottom line: Facebook faces no existential threat under the current administration. But if someone like Elizabeth Warren becomes the next president, that might change.

Go deeper

Louisiana braces for 3rd hurricane in 2 months as Tropical Storm Zeta nears

Municipality workers clean the streets of garbage in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, on Tuesday that was left by Zeta, which struck the Yucatan Peninsula as a Category 1 Hurricane a day earlier — causing no major damage to infrastructure. Photo: Medios y Media/Getty Images

Tropical Storm Zeta is expected to strengthen back into a hurricane and bring dangerous storm surge conditions to parts of the northern Gulf Coast on Wednesday, per the National Hurricane Center.

The state of play: Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) requested a pre-landfall Federal Declaration of Emergency in a letter to President Trump on Tuesday, ahead of the storm's expected arrival south of New Orleans.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Obama: Trump is "jealous of COVID's media coverage" Axios-Ipsos poll: Federal response has only gotten worse.
  2. Health: Hospitals face a crush — 13 states set single-day case records last week.
  3. Business: Winter threat spurs new surge of startup activity.
  4. Media: Pandemic causes TV providers to lose the most subscribers ever.
  5. States: Nearly two dozen Minnesota cases traced to three Trump campaign events.
  6. World: Putin mandates face masks.
2 hours ago - Technology

Trump's campaign website hacked

A screenshot of the Trump campaign website after it was hacked.

The Trump campaign website briefly went down and its "About" page was modified after hackers attacked the site Tuesday evening.

The big picture: With just seven days before the election, the hackers emulated the FBI and declared on the "About" page that: "this was seized. the world has had enough of the fake-news spreaded [sic] daily by president donald j trump. it is time to allow the world to know truth." Two addresses linked to the cryptocurrency Monero appeared on the site. Trump campaign spokesperson Tim Murtaugh in a statement said no sensitive data had been exposed in the attack.

Go deeper: Twitter hack raises fears of an unstable election