Mark Zuckerberg testifying before Congress earlier this year. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Facebook turned on its new political ad transparency regime on Thursday.

Why it matters: After the 2016 election manipulation scandal, Facebook's efforts to police ads on its platform will be closely watched ahead of the midterms. In a call with reporters, the company indicated it's paying close attention to developments regarding political ad regulation.

The details:

  • Starting Thursday, Facebook and Instagram United States election ads, in addition to ads on certain issues, will be marked as political with a label denoting who paid for them to run.
  • The company also debuted its archive of political advertisements — which it says will ultimately cover seven years of material. The company started putting ads in the archive in early May, said Facebook executive Rob Leathern.
  • Users will also be able to flag ads that they think are political, but aren't marked as such.

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Updated 6 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 31,361,979 — Total deaths: 965,642— Total recoveries: 21,528,674Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 6,859,117 — Total deaths: 199,911 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: The CDC's crumbling reputation — America turns against coronavirus vaccine.
  4. Politics: Elected officials are failing us on much-needed stimulus.
  5. Business: Two-thirds of business leaders think pandemic will lead to permanent changes — Wall Street fears stimulus is doomed.
  6. Sports: NFL fines maskless coaches.

Mitt Romney says he'll support moving forward with Supreme Court pick

Photo: Greg Nash/AFP/Pool via Getty Images

Mitt Romney announced Tuesday that he would support moving forward with a Senate vote on President Trump's selection to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Why it matters: Barring any big surprises, Democrats have virtually no shot at stopping the confirmation process for the president’s nominee before November’s election.

Trump says he will announce Supreme Court pick on Saturday

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Tuesday that he plans to announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday.

Why it matters: Republicans are moving fast to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which would tilt the balance of the high court in conservatives' favor and have lasting impact on climate policy, immigration and the Affordable Care Act. Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who met with the president this week, is a frontrunner for the job.

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