Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook has deployed a senior executive to Capitol Hill to address questions from concerned policymakers about the company's partnerships with other services.

Why it matters: Tech leaders used to leave worrying about Washington to their lobbyists, but that doesn't cut it any more. Facebook senior executives keep trooping to Washington because the social network sits at the heart of so many policy debates — and those debates are also central to its future.

Details: Ime Archibong, the company's VP of product partnerships, is meeting with House and Senate staffers this week in response to their requests for more information, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed.

  • Archibong will brief staff members who work for members of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees — both of which will play a key role in the debate over a national privacy law — on Tuesday. Expect the company's critics to take an interest: Sen. Ed Markey’s (D-Mass.) office confirmed his staff will attend the briefing.
  • Archibong, who is seen as close to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, also spoke off-the-record with members of the bipartisan Congressional Tech Staff Association on Monday. "This event is for staff only, no interns," said an invite obtained by Axios.

Flashback: Lawmakers were frustrated by reports late last year about the extent of Facebook's data sharing partnerships with outside companies like Spotify and Netflix.

  • Archibong played a central role in the company's defense, writing in a blog post that the partnerships were set up "via extensive negotiations and documentation, detailing how the third party would use the API, and what data they could and couldn’t access."
  • He is speaking with congressional staff about how the company structures partnerships and how it plans to approach them in the future, the spokesperson said.

Facebook head of cybersecurity policy Nathaniel Gleicher also took meetings in the House and Senate last week about overall efforts to protect its platform from malicious outside interference.

  • Gleicher addressed the most recent instance of meddling on the platform, which has been tied to Iran, a spokesperson said, although the meetings had been long-scheduled.
  • Among his stops was a wide-ranging meeting with Sen. Mark Warner (Va.), the top Democrat on the Intelligence Committee and a major Facebook critic, according to a source familiar with the matter.

The bigger picture: Washington became a regular stop on Facebook executives' itinerary once the company started facing intense scrutiny from lawmakers.

  • Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg both testified before key congressional committees within the last year.
  • Facebook spent a record $12.62 million on federal lobbying last year, according to public filings.

Go deeper

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden readies massive shifts in policy for his first days in office.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
  6. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.
Dave Lawler, author of World
6 hours ago - World

Alexey Navalny detained after landing back in Moscow

Navalny and his wife shortly before he was detained. Photo: Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny was detained upon his return to Moscow on Sunday, which came five months after he was poisoned with the nerve agent Novichok. He returned despite being warned that he would be arrested.

The latest: Navalny was stopped at a customs checkpoint and led away alone by officers. He appeared to hug his wife goodbye, and his spokesman reports that his lawyer was not allowed to accompany him.

Mike Allen, author of AM
8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's "overwhelming force" doctrine

President-elect Biden arrives to introduce his science team in Wilmington yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President-elect Biden has ordered up a shock-and-awe campaign for his first days in office to signal, as dramatically as possible, the radical shift coming to America and global affairs, his advisers tell us. 

The plan, Part 1 ... Biden, as detailed in a "First Ten Days" memo from incoming chief of staff Ron Klain, plans to unleash executive orders, federal powers and speeches to shift to a stark, national plan for "100 million shots" in three months.