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Video personalities Diamond and Silk speak at a Trump campaign rally. Photo: Johnny Louis/WireImage

Facebook said Wednesday it won't attend a House Judiciary Committee hearing later this week featuring two conservative video personalities, Diamond and Silk, who have accused the social platform of limiting the reach of their videos.

Why it matters: The company would have been exposing itself to some tough exchanges if it had appeared at the hearing, which will likely focus on how web platforms treat conservative views — though Facebook has denied charges of a company-wide bias against conservatives. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg addressed the issue multiple times during his more than 10 hours of congressional testimony earlier this month.

What they're saying: "We look forward to a continuing dialogue with members of the Committee about Facebook’s strong commitment to being a platform for all voices and ideas," said a spokesperson for the company.

The details:

  • Facebook was invited to appear alongside Google and Twitter, which haven't yet confirmed whether or not they're attending.
  • Other panels will include Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson (whose YouTube personality names are Diamond and Silk), and Rep. Marsha Blackburn, who had a campaign ad taken down from Twitter.

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Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.