A sign outside Facebook headquarters. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Facebook said Tuesday night that an investigation had unearthed "no evidence" that stolen keys to 50 million accounts were used to access third-party applications that let users log in with their Facebook credentials.

Why it matters: 50 million Facebook accounts is already a significant breach, but if Facebook's findings are correct, it means that the stolen "access tokens" weren't used to access even more services, which the company said Friday was possible. Services like Tinder, Spotify and Airbnb are among the thousands that offer Facebook's login tool to users.

What they're saying: "Any developers using Facebook Login security best practices were automatically protected when we reset people's access tokens," said Vice President of Product Management Guy Rosen in a statement. "Given that some developers will not have done this, we analyzed third party access during the time of the attack we have identified. That investigation has found no evidence that the attackers accessed any apps using Facebook Login."

Between the lines: There is a difference between having "accessed" an app and still having had the token to do so. This statement appears to concern the former.

Go deeper: Third-party apps are among those scrambling for answers a week after the breach was discovered.

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Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 11,520,461 — Total deaths: 535,499 — Total recoveries — 6,231,052Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 2,911,888 — Total deaths: 130,101 — Total recoveries: 906,763 — Total tested: 35,515,075Map.
  3. Public health: Case growth outpacing testing in hotspots.
  4. States: West Virginia becomes latest state to mandate facial coverings in public.
  5. Politics: Cuomo accuses Trump of "enabling" the coronavirus surge — Sen. Chuck Grassley opts out of attending GOP convention over coronavirus concerns.

Trump ramps up culture war attacks

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Trump's attacks are spreading to sports that are cornerstones of rural, conservative white American life.

Why it matters: The culture war that engulfed the NBA and NFL is reaching other major leagues, with teams that stonewalled activists for years suddenly showing a willingness to listen.

Foreign students could be forced to leave U.S. if colleges move online

Harvard University campus in April 2020. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Foreign college students could be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer schools if their universities move classes entirely online this fall, according to guidance released by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Monday.

Why it matters: Several U.S. colleges and universities — most recently Harvard — have announced plans to move most or all courses online this fall due to coronavirus concerns. Many institutions rely heavily on tuition from international students.