May 29, 2019

Exxon and Chevron to face investor pressure to do more on climate

Climate change activists in New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

ExxonMobil and Chevron, the biggest U.S.-based global oil giants, will face pressure to do more on climate change at their annual shareholders meetings today.

Why it matters: Investors have been pushing for climate-related commitments on the industry overall, but Exxon and Chevron have been less willing than European counterparts like Shell and BP.

Where it stands: Among other votes, resolutions urging creation of a board committee on climate change will come up at both meetings.

  • Chevron's investors will also vote on a resolution urging the company to cut carbon "in alignment" with the Paris agreement's temperature goal.

What's next: I'd be surprised if they pass over their boards' recommendations to vote no, but will be watching to see how much support they garner.

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What to watch in the Nevada debate

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Cengiz Yardages and Mario Tama/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg's wealth will fuel rather than shield him from tests and attacks when he makes his Democratic primary debate debut on the stage tonight in Las Vegas.

The state of play: Bernie Sanders is still the front-runner. So the other candidates must weigh which of the two presents a bigger threat to their viability: Sanders, with his combined delegate, polling and grassroots momentum? Or Bloomberg, with his bottomless budget?

Go deeperArrowUpdated 6 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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Trump expected to install Grenell as acting intelligence chief

Photo: Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

President Trump has told advisers he plans to install Richard Grenell, the current U.S. ambassador to Germany and a staunch defender of Trump, as the acting director of national intelligence, according to two senior administration officials. The news was first reported by the New York Times.

Why it matters: The role, which was originally vacated by Dan Coats in August 2019, is one of grave responsibility. As acting DNI, Grenell will be charged with overseeing and integrating the U.S. intelligence community and will advise the president and the National Security Council on intelligence matters that concern national security.