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Getty Images/ Alexander Koerner

Cyngn, a Silicon Valley startup that raised $115 million to build a more open flavor of the Android mobile operating system, has quietly changed course and is now working on autonomous driving technology.

New direction: Details are sparse, but Cyngn (formerly Cyanogen) appears to be developing self-driving car software and possibly hardware to match, based on its website and job listings. The company also recently received a permit to test self-driving cars on public roadways from California's Department of Motor Vehicles.

Team: CEO Lior Tal has been with Cyngn for a while (he had been COO until last October), but the other 30 or so employees appear to have joined since the strategy shift (per LinkedIn records). Among them are former Facebook managers (including Tal) and alumni of automakers like Mercedes-Benz and China's Future Mobility Corp. (which recently raised $200 million to build electric cars).

Backstory:

Once a tech industry darling—investors include Andreessen Horowitz, Benchmark, and Qualcomm Ventures—Cyanogen unraveled last year and eventually discontinued support for its software and services. Last October, CEO Kirt McMaster stepped down from the job, turning over the reigns to Tal. Soon after, CTO Steve Kondik, who later

blamed the company's troubles on McMaster

, left as well.

Go deeper

Most Senate Republicans join Rand Paul effort to dismiss Trump's 2nd impeachment trial

Photo: Joshua Roberts-Pool/Getty Images

Forty-five Senate Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, supported an effort to dismiss former President Trump's second impeachment trial.

Why it matters: The vote serves as a precursor to how senators will approach next month's impeachment trial, making it highly unlikely the Senate will vote to convict. The House impeached Trump for a second time for "incitement of insurrection" following events from Jan 6. when a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.

Texas judge temporarily halts Biden's 100-day deportation freeze

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A federal judge in Texas has temporarily blocked the Biden administration's 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants.

Why it matters: Biden has set an ambitious immigration agenda, but he could face pushback from the courts.

1 hour ago - Podcasts

Reddit is running Wall Street

Wall Street is locked in a battle of will between professional investors who live in Greenwich and amateur investors who congregate on Reddit. So far, the amateurs are winning, judging by increases in their chosen stocks, like GameStop and Bed, Bath & Beyond.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what's really happening, the mechanics of stock "shorting" and what it means for the markets' future, with Axios chief financial correspondent Felix Salmon.