Two men wear "Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America" T-shirts at a Fourth of July celebration in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

New Jersey just passed a "Red Flag" bill that will allow local authorities to temporarily confiscate guns from people who are considered to be a risk to society or themselves.

Why it matters: Since the Parkland shooting, five states have now passed this legislation, including three with Republican governors, signaling a shift in how statehouses are viewing and acting on the issue of gun violence. Everytown for Gun Safety, a Michael Bloomberg-financed nonprofit that advocates for stronger gun safety laws, has been a major political force behind this movement.

The big picture: Everytown's work on this issue — from meeting with local lawmakers to endorsing and supporting candidates committed to gun safety — is a clear example of how gun violence is becoming an election factor at every level of government.

  • More than 70 volunteers with Everytown and Moms Demand Action held 10 meetings with New Jersey lawmakers to discuss the "Red Flag" bill and gun safety legislation. They also participated in an annual advocacy day last week for this bill.
  • The other states that have passed this bill since Parkland: Vermont, Florida, Rhode Island and Maryland.

What they're saying: "Gun safety went from being the third rail of American politics to the first thing on the minds of many voters," John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, told Axios in a statement.

What to watch: Whether these successes for gun violence groups at the local level encourage the NRA to double down on their gun platform in the midterm elections. And Massachusetts, Illinois and Delaware are on deck to potentially pass similar legislation.

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
4 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.

Biden to Trump: "I have not taken a penny from any foreign source ever in my life"

Former VP Joe Biden pushed back Thursday against allegations from President Trump, saying he had never profited from foreign sources. "Nothing was unethical," Biden told debate moderator Kristen Welker about his son Hunter's work in Ukraine while he was vice president.

Why it matters: Earlier on Thursday, Hunter Biden's former business partner, Tony Bobulinski, released a statement saying Joe Biden's claims that he never discussed overseas business dealings with his son were "false."