Two men wear "Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America" T-shirts at a Fourth of July celebration in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

New Jersey just passed a "Red Flag" bill that will allow local authorities to temporarily confiscate guns from people who are considered to be a risk to society or themselves.

Why it matters: Since the Parkland shooting, five states have now passed this legislation, including three with Republican governors, signaling a shift in how statehouses are viewing and acting on the issue of gun violence. Everytown for Gun Safety, a Michael Bloomberg-financed nonprofit that advocates for stronger gun safety laws, has been a major political force behind this movement.

The big picture: Everytown's work on this issue — from meeting with local lawmakers to endorsing and supporting candidates committed to gun safety — is a clear example of how gun violence is becoming an election factor at every level of government.

  • More than 70 volunteers with Everytown and Moms Demand Action held 10 meetings with New Jersey lawmakers to discuss the "Red Flag" bill and gun safety legislation. They also participated in an annual advocacy day last week for this bill.
  • The other states that have passed this bill since Parkland: Vermont, Florida, Rhode Island and Maryland.

What they're saying: "Gun safety went from being the third rail of American politics to the first thing on the minds of many voters," John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, told Axios in a statement.

What to watch: Whether these successes for gun violence groups at the local level encourage the NRA to double down on their gun platform in the midterm elections. And Massachusetts, Illinois and Delaware are on deck to potentially pass similar legislation.

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Updated 51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 19,769,560— Total deaths: 729,351 — Total recoveries — 12,030,061Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 5,041,573 — Total deaths: 162,913 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on unemployment — Mnuchin says Trump executive orders were cleared by Justice Department.
  4. States: New York reports lowest rate of positive coronavirus test results since pandemic began
  5. Public health: Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths by end of 2020. 
  6. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on.

New York reports new low positive coronavirus test rate

People physically distancing at tables in New York City's Times Square in June. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Sunday 515 people, or 0.78% of those tested, returned a positive reading for COVID-19 the previous day.

Why it matters: It's the lowest single-day positive rate since the start of the pandemic. It's another sign that the state that was once a global coronavirus epicenter is curbing the spread of the virus. "Our daily numbers remain low and steady, despite increasing infection rates across the country, and even in our region," Cuomo said in a statement. "But we must not become complacent: Everyone should continue to wear their masks and socially distance."

Go deeper: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning

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Protests erupt in Belarus after "Europe's last dictator" claims election victory

A man lies on the ground in front of riot police in Minsk. Photo: Sergei Gapon/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrations broke out across Belarus on Sunday after a government exit poll predicted that President Aleksander Lukashenko, an authoritarian who has ruled the Eastern European country since 1994, had swept to overwhelming victory over a pro-democracy opposition candidate.

Why it matters: It's a precarious moment for the former Soviet republic, where decades of repression and a complete disregard for the coronavirus pandemic now threaten to topple "Europe's last dictator."