Jan 5, 2019

Everything Trump says he knows "more about than anybody"

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump this week revealed yet another subject matter in which he claims to have expertise: drones and drone technology.

"I know more about drones than anybody. I know about every form of safety that you can have."

The big picture: President Trump says he's an expert on a lot of things, including ISIS, taxes, technology, nuclear arms and even Sen. Cory Booker.

  • Campaign finance: "I think nobody knows more about campaign finance than I do, because I'm the biggest contributor." (1999.)
  • TV ratings: "I know more about people who get ratings than anyone." (October 2012.)
  • ISIS: "I know more about ISIS than the generals do." (November 2015.)
  • Social media: "I understand social media. I understand the power of Twitter. I understand the power of Facebook maybe better than almost anybody, based on my results, right?" (November 2015.)
  • Courts: "I know more about courts than any human being on Earth." (November 2015.)
  • Lawsuits: "[W]ho knows more about lawsuits than I do? I'm the king." (January 2016.)
  • Politicians: "I understand politicians better than anybody."
  • The visa system: "[N]obody knows the system better than me. I know the H1B. I know the H2B. ... Nobody else on this dais knows how to change it like I do, believe me." (March 2016.)
  • Trade: "Nobody knows more about trade than me." (March 2016.)
  • The U.S. government system: "[N]obody knows the system better than I do." (April 2016.)
  • Renewable energy: "I know more about renewables than any human being on Earth." (April 2016.)
  • Taxes: "I think nobody knows more about taxes than I do, maybe in the history of the world." (May 2016.)
  • Debt: "I’m the king of debt. I’m great with debt. Nobody knows debt better than me." (June 2016.)
  • Money: "I understand money better than anybody." (June 2016.)
  • Infrastructure: "[L]ook, as a builder, nobody in the history of this country has ever known so much about infrastructure as Donald Trump." (July 2016.)
  • Sen. Cory Booker: "I know more about Cory than he knows about himself." (July 2016.)
  • Borders: Trump said in 2016 that Sheriff Joe Arpaio said he was endorsing him for president because "you know more about this stuff than anybody."
  • Democrats: "I think I know more about the other side than almost anybody." (November 2016.)
  • Construction: "[N]obody knows more about construction than I do." (May 2018.)
  • The economy: "I think I know about it better than [the Federal Reserve]." (October 2018.)
  • Technology: "Technology — nobody knows more about technology than me." (December 2018.)
  • Drones: "I know more about drones than anybody. I know about every form of safety that you can have." (January 2019.)
  • Drone technology: "Having a drone fly overhead — and I think nobody knows much more about technology, this type of technology certainly, than I do." (January 2019.)

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