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Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Epicurious will no longer publish beef recipes in what is being called a "pro-planet" shift, the popular digital food magazine has announced.

Driving the news: The Condé Nast-owned publication's Maggie Hoffman and David Tamarkin wrote in a post Monday that the decision was "solely about sustainability, about not giving airtime to one of the world's worst climate offenders."

"We know that some people might assume that this decision signals some sort of vendetta against cows — or the people who eat them. But this decision was not made because we hate hamburgers (we don’t!)."
— excerpt from Epicurious' article
  • The Epicurious article noted that nearly nearly 15% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide come from livestock and 61% of those emissions "can be traced back to beef."

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Bryan Walsh: Epicurious' move comes as beef becomes the latest front in an ongoing culture war.

  • Per-capita beef consumption in the U.S. has fallen in recent years, with poultry taking up the slack and new plant-based meat products, like Beyond Meat's new 3.0 burger, rising in popularity.

The other side: North American Meat Institute spokesperson Sarah Little said in a statement: "The real question should be how excluding America’s favorite food impacts Epicurious. Perhaps the reduced web traffic will save some electricity."

Go deeper: How the coronavirus is changing our diets

Go deeper

USDA chief: Biden won't cut red meat consumption

Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Monday that President Biden has no plans to cut red meat consumption as part of his efforts to combat climate change, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Conservative lawmakers and pundits had spread baseless claims that Biden's wide-ranging climate action plan includes a proposal to reduce red meat consumption by 90% and limit people to four pounds of red meat per year.

Drought pushes 2 major U.S. lakes to historic lows

Kayakers at a boat launch ramp Page, Arizona, on July 3, which was made unusable by record low water levels at Lake Powell as the drought continues to worsen near. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images

Two significant U.S. lakes, one of which is a major reservoir, are experiencing historic lows amid a drought that scientists have linked to climate change.

What's happening: Lake Powell, the second largest reservoir in the U.S., has fallen 3,554 feet in elevation, leaving the crucial reservoir on the Colorado River, at 33% capacity — the lowest since it was filled over half a century ago, new U.S. Bureau of Reclamation data shows.

Updated 1 hour ago - World

North and South Korea restart hotline and pledge to improve ties

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang, North Korea, in 2018. Photo: Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images

North and South Korea's leaders have pledged to improve relations and resume previously suspended communication channels between the two countries.

Why it matters: The resumption of the hotline on Tuesday comes despite stalled negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang on the denuclearization of North Korea, which broke down after a second summit between then-President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un ended without a deal in 2019.