Evan Vucci / AP

Speaking to the nation's governors on Saturday, Elon Musk defended his strategy of engaging with President Trump.

"It was worth trying," he said, in response to a question from Axios. "I got a lot of flack from multiple fronts for even trying. Some guy rented billboards attacking me and (took out) full-page ads in the NY Times and what not... just for being on the panel."

Musk said in each meeting he tried to make the case for sustainability and also address some other issues, including ensuring "immigration laws [were] not unkind or unreasonable."

"I did my best, and I think in a few cases I did make some progress," he said. But remaining engaged after the President's move to exit the Paris accord, he said, would be akin to saying that wasn't a consequential move.

"If I stayed on the councils it would be saying that wasn't important, but I think it's super important. The country needs to keep its word. There's just no way I could stay on after that."

Musk also touched on a range of other issues, including offering up a prediction that within 10 years all new cars in the U.S. would be autonomous, and half of those would be electric.

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Ford names James Farley as new CEO amid ongoing turnaround effort

James Hackett, left, is retiring as Ford CEO. Jim Farley, right, takes over Oct. 1. Photo: Ford

Ford announced Tuesday that James Farley will take over as its next CEO, replacing James Hackett, 65, who is retiring after three years in the job.

Why it matters: It leaves Farley to complete the company's ongoing turnaround effort. The transition will be that much harder as the industry tries to navigate the coronavirus-induced economic slowdown which shuttered Ford plants for two months on the eve of some of its most important vehicle launches.

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Watch the full "Axios on HBO" interview with President Trump

In this episode of “Axios on HBO”, President Trump discusses his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming election and much more with National Political Correspondent Jonathan Swan.

The interview was filmed on Tuesday, July 28 and aired Monday, Aug. 3 on HBO.

Mergers and acquisitions make a comeback

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A slew of high-profile headlines led by Microsoft's expected acquisition of social media video app TikTok helped bring the Nasdaq to another record high on Monday.

Why it matters: The mergers-and-acquisitions market looks like it's bouncing back, joining the revived credit and equity markets as well as the market for new public companies through IPOs and special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs).