Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren pledged Tuesday to start an independent Justice Department task force if elected to investigate possible corruption by members of the Trump administration "to restore public confidence in government and deter future wrongdoing."

The big picture: While presidents historically have avoided large-scale investigations of their predecessors, Warren's message tracks with her anti-corruption stance — as she has previously pledged to institute a huge set of reforms to increase government transparency and peel back power from lobbyists.

  • Warren's pledge said she would ask for the resignation of all of President Trump's political appointees at the start of her administration, retaining "only those positions necessary to preserve continuity and protect national security during the transition period."

What she's saying:

"Rebuilding our government to work for the people won’t just happen. It’s going to require painstaking work, extraordinary drive and urgency, and a serious plan to root out the corruption and incompetence that Trump will leave behind. That means cleaning out the corruption that has infected the government, and it means moving immediately to fill key jobs and set up agencies with capable officials committed to putting the public interest first."

Go deeper: Bernie Sanders-Elizabeth Warren battle upstaged by viral right-wing media

Go deeper

The TikTok deal's for-show provisions and flimsy foundations

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The new deal to rescue TikTok from a threatened U.S. ban — full of provisions aimed at creating the temporary appearance of a presidential win — looks like a sort of Potemkin village agreement.

How it works: Potemkin villages were fake-storefront towns stood up to impress a visiting czar and dignitaries. When the visitors left, the stage set got struck.

  • Similarly, many elements of this plan look hastily erected and easily abandoned once the spotlight moves on.
1 hour ago - Technology

Over 3 million U.S. voters have already registered on social media

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

An estimated 2.5 million+ Americans have registered to vote on Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger, Facebook announced Monday. More than 733,000 Americans have registered to vote so far via Snapchat.

Why it matters: The broad reach of social media platforms makes them uniquely effective at engaging voters — especially younger voters who may not know how to register to vote or be civically engaged.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street: Recession is over

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. economic activity fell more sharply in the second quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history. It's also going to grow more sharply in the third quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history.

  • The recession is over, according to Wall Street, with current forecasts showing sustained economic growth through 2021 and beyond.