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2020 Democratic contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren is reviving her push to require detailed disclosures from publicly traded companies about climate change.

Why it matters: It's part of the push by Warren, one of the top-tier Democratic candidates, for much stronger financial regulation to reshape markets in a way that she says would provide greater public benefit.

What she's saying: Warren supports "using the power of public markets to accelerate the adoption of clean energy," she wrote in a Medium post.

Driving the news: Warren just reintroduced her legislation that would require filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission that cover areas including:

  • Greenhouse gas emissions, both direct and indirect.
  • Fossil fuel assets.
  • Physical risks from climate change and risks stemming from the global transition to a lower-carbon economy.

But, but, but: The prospects for the bill are highly uncertain even if Democrats were to gain control of the Senate in 2020.

  • However, the Warren campaign tells me that some of the goals could be advanced without legislation if she's elected president.
  • "The SEC does have the tools to require more robust disclosures and Elizabeth will look for nominees who will pick up these tools," spokesperson Saloni Sharma told me via email.

The big picture: Revival of the proposal signals how Warren and some other candidates are crafting plans that would extend climate policy into many corners of government, not just the major resource agencies and EPA.

  • The legislation is co-sponsored by several other 2020 hopefuls — Sens. Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Cory Booker, Amy Klobuchar and Michael Bennet.
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is co-sponsoring a House version.

Go deeper: Elizabeth Warren on the issues, in under 500 words

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Judge temporarily halts Trump's WeChat ban

Photo: Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A federal judge early on Sunday temporarily blocked a Trump administration order banning the downloads of the Chinese-owned, global messaging app WeChat.

Why it matters: The temporary injunction means WeChat will remain on Apple and Google's app stores, despite a Commerce Department order to remove the app by Sunday evening.

Bill Clinton slams McConnell and Trump: "Their first value is power"

Former President Bill Clinton on Sunday called Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) vow to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's vacant Supreme Court seat before the next presidential inauguration "superficially hypocritical."

The big picture: Clinton, who nominated Ginsburg to the court in 1993, declined to say whether he thinks Democrats should respond by adding more justices if they take back the Senate and the White House in November. Instead, he called on Republicans to "remember the example Abraham Lincoln set" by not confirming a justice in an election year.

Pelosi: Trump wants to "crush" ACA with Ginsburg replacement

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that President Trump is rushing to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he "wants to crush the Affordable Care Act."

Why it matters: Pelosi wants to steer the conversation around the potential Ginsburg replacement to health care, which polls show is a top issue for voters, especially amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Trump administration has urged the courts to strike down the law, and with it, protections for millions with pre-existing conditions.