Oct 14, 2019

Ecuador’s president agrees not to slash fuel subsidies amid deadly protests

Protestors in Quito on Oct. 7. Photo: Cristina Vega/AFP via Getty Images

Ecuador's President Lenín Moreno said on Sunday that his administration would agree not to terminate the country's fuel subsidies and sit for talks with indigenous groups, in an effort to end deadly protests that had roiled the country, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Why it matters: Thousands of Ecuadorians, set off by Moreno's announcement that he would end a 4-decade-old, $1.4 billion-per-year fuel subsidy, have been protesting for almost 2 weeks, clashing with police, ransacking government buildings and looting businesses. Confrontations between demonstrators and state security forces have resulted in 7 deaths, 1,300 injured and 1,152 arrests.

Go deeper: Ecuador’s president flees the capital amid protests

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Iraqi police kill at least 42 protesters amid renewed demonstrations

Iraqi protesters gather on the capital Baghdad's Al-Jumhuriyah Bridge. Photo: AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi police killed at least 42 protesters as of Saturday in Baghdad — just three weeks after the first set of deadly protests left about 150 people dead across the country, Al Jazeera reports.

Why it matters: The unrest has ended roughly two years of stability in Iraq. Early October protests were paused after violence against protesters grew, but demonstrators returned to the streets this week, again calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi, per Al Jazeera.

Go deeperArrowOct 26, 2019

Hong Kong revokes extradition bill that triggered protests

A pro-democracy protester being detained by riot police on Oct. 21. Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

The Hong Kong government on Wednesday withdrew an extradition bill that set off months of protests and sparked a greater pro-democracy movement in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory, the AP reports.

Why it matters: Though Hong Kong Secretary for Security John Lee said the government was suspending the bill because of civil unrest, it is unclear if the withdrawal will appease demonstrators, who have been protesting for five months.

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Keep ReadingArrowOct 23, 2019

Capital markets feel the global protest wave

A doll effigy of Chilean President Sebastián Piñera. Photo: Cristóbal Venegas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Violent protests in Chile, an OECD member long known as Latin America's slow, steady and stable credit, continued for the sixth night in a row Wednesday.

Why it matters: Markets are responding much more quickly to the state of unrest, with Chile's capital markets already pricing in negative outcomes.

Go deeperArrowOct 24, 2019