Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!
Data: New York Fed; Chart: Axios Visuals

The New York Fed's Weekly Economic Index (WEI) is reversing course, showing real-time, high-frequency economic data is again turning negative after climbing back from April and May's coronavirus-driven swoon.

Why it matters: The index is one of many that show the economy is getting worse in a trend that could be picking up steam.

  • The WEI represents the common component of 10 different daily and weekly series covering consumer behavior, the labor market and production.
  • It is scaled to the four-quarter GDP growth rate and if it continues on its current trajectory would mean U.S. GDP is poised to sink by 7% in Q3 and decline year over year for the third straight quarter.

What's happening: In addition to the New York Fed's index, real-time data trackers from Goldman Sachs, Jefferies and Oxford Economics have all turned from stalling to falling.

  • The St. Louis Fed's coincident employment index has turned lower, showing jobs growth has reversed.
  • The number of employees returning to work at small- and medium-sized businesses declined by at least 5% from early June to mid-July, according to Homebase.
  • TSA data showed the first weekly decline in people passing through checkpoints since April.

What's next: "Economic data over the next few weeks will likely underscore the depth of the recession and provide a warning that a full recovery is still far from being achieved," David Kelly, chief global strategist at JPMorgan Asset Management, says in a note to clients.

Where it stands: While many investors are counting on stimulus from Congress as well as a renewed balance sheet expansion from the Fed if economic data continue to deteriorate, Kelly says this is akin to "pumping air into a leaky tire."

  • "Government spending will also likely drag on the economy as many state and local governments will be forced to cut payrolls to balance budgets in reaction to the deep recession and lack of sufficient federal government aid."
  • He anticipates real GDP will fall 7.5% year over year in the third quarter, with much slower future progress without the widespread distribution of a vaccine.

The bottom line: "To state the obvious, economic uncertainty is extraordinarily high right now, even eclipsing levels at the worst of the financial crisis," Kelly says.

  • "It is the pandemic, rather than any lack of stimulus, that is holding the economy back."
  • "[I]n a pandemic economy, stimulus alone cannot trigger a full recovery."

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Oct 28, 2020 - Economy & Business

Coronavirus surge is sinking consumer confidence

Data: Hamilton Place Strategies, CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

The rise in coronavirus cases in certain parts of the U.S. is stunting confidence across the country, a crop of new reports show.

Driving the news: After stalling during the previous two-week period, overall economic sentiment declined for the first time in two months, according to the Economic Sentiment Index, a biweekly survey from data firm CivicScience and Hamilton Place Strategies (HPS).

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Oct 28, 2020 - Economy & Business

The Rust Belt jobs boom that never came under Trump

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Rust Belt, the upper Midwest manufacturing hub that was the backbone of U.S. production, has seen jobs and wages erode under President Trump, new data shows — and the decline happened before the coronavirus pandemic hit.

What it means: "While job and wage growth continued nationally under Trump, extending trends that took root under President Obama, the country’s economic weight also continued shifting south and west, according to data from the U.S. Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages that was recently updated to include the first three months of 2020," Reuters' Howard Schneider writes.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Updated 3 mins ago - Economy & Business

How central banks can save the world

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The trillion-dollar gap between actual GDP and potential GDP is a gap made up of misery, unemployment, and unfulfilled promise. It's also a gap that can be eradicated — if central banks embrace unconventional monetary policy.

  • That's the message from Eric Lonergan and Megan Greene, two economists who reject the idea that central banks have hit a "lower bound" on interest rates. In fact, they reject the idea that "interest rates" are a singular thing at all, and they fullthroatedly reject the idea — most recently put forward by New York Fed president Bill Dudley — that the Fed is "out of firepower."

Why it matters: If Lonergan and Greene are right, then central banks have effectively unlimited ammunition in their fight to increase inflation and employment. They are limited only by political will.