Eatsa's Spear Street store in San Francisco. Photo: Eatsa

Eatsa, a four-year-old company that operates restaurants without humans interacting with customers, is shutting down five of its seven restaurants (only its two San Francisco locations will remain). The company also said in a blog post that it will shift its focus on getting other restaurants to use its technology.

Eatsa expanded to Berkeley, Calif., Washington, D.C., and New York City last year after having two locations in downtown San Francisco.

Why it matters: It's hard to tell what exactly led Eatsa to this change. Earlier this year it overhauled its menu in an attempt to provide more personalized dishes to customers, but it quickly started to bring back some of its old menu based on customer feedback. And while there are no humans in the store front (other than one employee to handle any problems with orders), they do work in the hidden kitchens, which means Eatsa still has to manage certain aspects of a traditional restaurant. The move could be a hint the company would rather be in the technology business, rather than retail.

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Updated 43 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 31,467,508 — Total deaths: 967,881— Total recoveries: 21,583,915Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 6,890,662 — Total deaths: 200,710 — Total recoveries: 2,646,959 — Total tests: 96,612,436Map.
  3. Health: The U.S. reaches 200,000 coronavirus deaths — The CDC's crumbling reputation — America turns against coronavirus vaccine.
  4. Politics: Elected officials are failing us on much-needed stimulus.
  5. Business: Two-thirds of business leaders think pandemic will lead to permanent changes — Fed chair warns economy will feel the weight of expired stimulus.
  6. Sports: NFL fines maskless coaches.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
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GoodRx prices IPO at $33 per share, valued at $12.7 billion

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

GoodRx, a price comparison app for prescription drugs at local pharmacies, on Tuesday night raised $1.14 billion in its IPO, Axios has learned.

By the numbers: GoodRx priced its shares at $33 a piece, above its $24-$28 per share offering range, which will give it an initial market cap of around $12.7 billion.

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House Democrats and Trump admin strike deal to avert government shutdown

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Capitol Hill. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

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Why it matters: The bill will avert a government shutdown when funding expires in eight days. Pelosi and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said earlier that they hoped to hold a vote on the legislation on Tuesday evening.

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