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The Eiffel Tower submerges into darkness as part of the Earth Hour switch-off in Paris, France, on Saturday. Photo: Pierre Suu/Getty Images

Cities around the world were turning landmark lights off Saturday for Earth Hour, with this year's theme highlighting the link between the destruction of nature and increasing outbreaks of diseases like COVID-19.

The big picture: City landmarks around the world went dark for an hour at 8:30p.m. to mark global action on climate change. Organizer WWF said in a statement, "COVID-19 has given us a stark warning of the risks, vulnerabilities and inequalities of our interconnected systems."

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
The Palace of Westminster, containing the House of Commons and House of Lords, takes part in Earth Hour in London, England. UN chief António Guterres in a statement called 2021 a "make-or-break year" for the climate, saying: "It’s time to re-evaluate and reset our relationship with nature." Photo: Yui Mok/PA Images via Getty Images
The India Gate in New Delhi, India. Photo: Prakash Singh/AFP via Getty Images
The Xi'an Bell Tower's lights are turned off in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China. Photo: Shang Hongtao/VCG via Getty Images
A view of the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, with the lights off. Photo: Baris Seckin/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House are plunged into darkness in Australia. Photo: Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images
A view from Red Square during Earth Hour in Moscow, Russia. Photo: Sefa Karacan/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Combination images of a view of the Puente de la Mujer at Puerto Madero neighborhood before (top) and after being submerged into darkness in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Photo: Alejandro Pagini/AFP via Getty Images
Combination images of South Korea's Namdaemun Gate before (top) and after its lights went out in Seoul. Photo: Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper: Living with climate catastrophe

Go deeper

In photos: Deadly tornadoes leave path of destruction across the South

The aftermath of the tornadoes in Ohatchee, Alabama. Photo: Julie Bennett via Getty Images

A major outbreak of high-end, "violent" tornadoes and severe storms ripped through the South on Thursday, leaving behind debris and destruction.

The big picture: At least six people were killed. Severe weather in this region can be especially deadly due to the housing types that are prevalent here, including large numbers of mobile homes, Axios' Andrew Freedman writes.

What we know about the victims of the Indianapolis mass shooting

Officials load a body into a vehicle at the site of the mass shooting in Indianapolis. Photo:

Eight people who were killed along with several others who were injured in a Thursday evening shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis have been identified by local law enforcement.

The big picture: The Sikh Coalition said at least four of the eight victims were members of the Indianapolis Sikh community.

Pompeo, wife misused State Dept. resources, federal watchdog finds

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The State Department's independent watchdog found that former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo violated federal ethics rules when he and his wife asked department employees to perform personal tasks on more than 100 occasions, including picking up their dog and making private dinner reservations.

Why it matters: The report comes as Pompeo pours money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run.