Kate Jaspon, the chief financial officer of Dunkin' Brands (right). Photo: Axios

About 20% of Dunkin' Brands' customer transactions are digital in some form, Kate Jaspon, the company's chief financial officer, said Tuesday during an Axios virtual event.

Why it matters: Many restaurants and fast-food chains have had to drastically change or speed up their investment in technology services to make orders hands-free, cashless and safer for customers and workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

The state of play: Jaspon said their app, perks, curbside pickup and drive-thru options have made it easier for people to access coffee and drinks that are not so easy to make at home.

  • "It’s really about providing products that apply to all different demographics and really provide a product that is not something the consumer can make at home and maybe provides them with a nice break from reality," she said.
  • "Now-days I like to joke that folks get 'Zoomed out' and they need to get out and get a break, and so it’s important to have these products."

Yes, but: Companies that push cashless or virtual-only payment options often leave some demographic groups out of the mix. Jaspon said Dunkin' franchisees accept all forms of payment during the pandemic.

Watch the event, Axios' Smart Main Street, on Axios.com.

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