Mar 15, 2019

Dueling human rights reports

Every year, the U.S. and China release reports on the human rights situations in each other's country.

What's happening: Per Xinhua, some of the highlighted issues in China's report include: The severe infringement on citizens' civil rights; the prevalence of money politics, the rising income inequality; worsening racial discrimination, and growing threats against children, women and immigrants; human rights violations caused by the unilateral America First policies and gun violence.

The report also noted that:

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Some of the highlighted issues in the U.S. State Department's report on China include:

  • A significant intensification of the campaign of mass detention of members of Muslim minority groups in the Xinjiang.
  • Arbitrary or unlawful killings by the government.
  • Forced disappearances by the government.
  • Torture by the government.
  • Arbitrary detention by the government.
  • Political prisoners.
  • Physical attacks on and criminal prosecution of journalists, lawyers, writers, bloggers, dissidents, petitioners, and others as well as their family members;
  • Severe restrictions of religious freedom.

Why it matters: Pointing out America's shortcomings while denying its own serves China's broader strategy of slowly chipping away at America's credibility globally.

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