Photo: George Frey/Getty Images

Wall Street panicked a little after the Trump administration rolled out its drug rebate proposal, but the stock prices of companies most at risk recovered because there’s still so much uncertainty about how the policy would change their businesses.

The big picture: The proposal would bar pharmacy benefit managers and insurers from accepting rebates from drug companies in Medicare and Medicaid under anti-kickback law. Instead, the two sides could work out fixed-fee arrangements, with rebates flowing directly from manufacturers to patients at the pharmacy counter.

Yes, but: The rule...

  • Would not immediately affect the commercial market, although HHS Secretary Alex Azar wants Congress to pass the proposal into law so it would apply everywhere.
  • Would not touch the other profitable tactics that PBMs have mastered, like spread pricing and generic drug algorithms.
  • Would take a swipe at a flawed rebate system, but push middlemen to raise premiums — which federal actuaries said could raise Medicare spending as much as $196 billion over the next decade.
  • Would almost certainly initiate a lawsuit on antitrust grounds.
  • Would "not have a meaningful impact on our growth or earnings trajectory," David Cordani, CEO of Cigna and its newly acquired Express Scripts, said on an earnings call Friday.

One thing that is pretty certain: Pharma wins. There’s no mandate to lower list prices, and drug companies would get to see competitors' rebates.

Go deeper: The Trump administration's major shakeup in the way we pay for drugs

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Facebook boycott organizers share details on their Zuckerberg meeting

Facebook is in the midst of the largest ad boycott in its history, with nearly 1,000 brands having stopped paid advertising in July because they feel Facebook hasn't done enough to remove hate speech from its namesake app and Instagram.

Axios Re:Cap spoke with the boycott's four main organizers, who met on Tuesday with CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other top Facebook executives, to learn why they organized the boycott, what they took from the meeting, and what comes next.

Boycott organizers slam Facebook following tense virtual meeting

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Civil rights leaders blasted Facebook's top executives shortly after speaking with them on Tuesday, saying that the tech giant's leaders "failed to meet the moment" and were "more interested in having a dialogue than producing outcomes."

Why it matters: The likely fallout from the meeting is that the growing boycott of Facebook's advertising platform, which has reached nearly 1000 companies in less than a month, will extend longer than previously anticipated, deepening Facebook's public relations nightmare.

Steve Scalise PAC invites donors to fundraiser at Disney World

Photo: Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s PAC is inviting lobbyists to attend a four-day “Summer Meeting” at Disney World's Polynesian Village in Florida, all but daring donors to swallow their concern about coronavirus and contribute $10,000 to his leadership PAC.

Why it matters: Scalise appears to be the first House lawmakers to host an in-person destination fundraiser since the severity of pandemic became clear. The invite for the “Summer Meeting” for the Scalise Leadership Fund, obtained by Axios, makes no mention of COVID-19.