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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey faced skeptical questions at a Wednesday House hearing convened because of Republican allegations of an anti-conservative bias on the platform.

Why it matters: President Trump has seized on the concerns of anti-conservative censorship over the last week — publicly blasting web companies — despite a lack of evidence of platforms intentionally build bias into their systems.

What they're saying:

  • Republicans raised concerns about a recent instance in which certain conservatives were not included in the auto-fill feature of Twitter's search. "Out of the more than 300 million active Twitter users, why did this only happen to certain accounts?” asked House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden.

Democrats pushed back on the bias allegations, with top committee Democrat Rep. Frank Pallone saying that Republicans were "trying to rally their base by fabricating a problem that simply does not exist."

  • Pallone also questioned whether the platform is taking the right measures to make sure that celebrities and politicians, like Trump, face the same rules as other individuals.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle pushed Dorsey on what he's doing to get rid of harassment online. "I understand there are algorithms, I understand that there have to be checks and balances, but really it shouldn’t take hours for something that's that egregious to come down," said Republican Rep. Michael Burgess of a recent doctored image that of a daughter of the late Sen. John McCain.

But but but: Even during tense moments of questioning, the hearing has lacked the fireworks of some earlier Capitol Hill conversations about alleged bias on social media, save for when a protestor briefly disrupted the proceedings.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
26 mins ago - World

Biden's blinking red lights: Taiwan, Ukraine and Iran

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Russia is menacing Ukraine’s borders, China is sending increasingly ominous signals over Taiwan and Iran is accelerating its uranium enrichment to unprecedented levels.

The big picture: Ukraine, Taiwan and Iran’s nuclear program always loomed large on the menu of potential crises President Biden could face. But over the last several days, the lights have been blinking red on all three fronts all at once.

Updated 7 hours ago - World

Skripal poisoning suspects linked to Czech blast, as country expels 18 Russians

Combined images released by British police in 2018 of Alexander Petrov (L) and Ruslan Boshirov, who are suspected of carrying out an attack in the in the southern English city of Salisbury using Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent, and also the2014 Czech depot explosion. Photo: Metropolitan Police via Getty Images

Czech police on Saturday connected two Russian men suspected of carrying out a poisoning attack in Salisbury, England, with a deadly ammunition depot explosion southeast of the capital, Prague, per Reuters.

Driving the news: Czech officials announced Saturday they're expelling 18 Russian diplomats they accuse of being involved in the blast in Vrbětice, AP notes. Czech police said later they're searching for two men carrying several passports — including two with the names Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov.

Indianapolis mass shooting suspect legally bought 2 guns, police say

Marion County Forensic Services vehicles are parked at the site of a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Friday. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

The suspected gunman in this week's mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally purchased two "assault rifles" believed to have been used in the attack, police said late Saturday.

Of note: The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's statement that Brandon Scott Hole, 19, bought the rifles last July and September comes a day after the FBI told news outlets that a "shotgun was seized" from the suspect in March 2020 after his mother raised concerns about his mental health.