Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday ruled that President Trump must turn over eight years of his tax returns to a state grand jury, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Trump's attorney Jay Sekulow said after the ruling that the president's legal team is appealing the case to the Supreme Court, according to Politico's Darren Samuelsohn.

Details: The court dodged Trump's legal team's argument that he is immune from criminal investigations while in the White House, saying instead that the president’s accounting firm is being subpoenaed for the documents — not Trump himself.

Background: The legal fight over Trump's tax returns started in August when Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. subpoenaed the president’s accounting firm, Mazars, as part of a criminal investigation into allegations that the Trump Organization made hush money payment during the 2016 presidential election to two women who had affairs with Trump.

  • Vance Jr. requested the president's tax returns and those of his family business dating back to 2011.
  • Michael Cohen, Trump's former personal lawyer, is currently serving out a 3-year sentence for campaign finance violations for making a $130,000 payment to adult film star Stormy Daniels and a $150,000 payment to Playboy model Karen McDougal on the condition that they did not reveal their past relationships with Trump.
  • Vance Jr. is investigating whether the Trump Organization falsely listed its reimbursement of Cohen for the $130,000 payment to Daniels as a legal expense.
  • Trump's lawyers countersued the subpoena, saying the criminal investigation of the president was unconstitutional.

Go deeper: Trump lawyer argues the president can't be prosecuted for shooting someone

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Justice Department sues Google over alleged search monopoly

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections.

In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.