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Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump offered Mexico military support on Tuesday after at least nine members of a Mormon family — who held U.S. and Mexican citizenship — were killed during a cartel attack near the border, reports CNN.

Why it matters: The brutal attack highlights "the escalating danger posed by organized-crime groups" in Mexico, writes the Washington Post.

The backdrop: The victims are members of the LeBaron clan. "Offshoot groups such as the LeBaron family began to form in Mexico in the early 1900s" after disagreeing with the central Mormon church over polygamy, per the Post. They've since lived in Mexican farming communities while maintaining ties with the U.S.

  • Three women, four small children and two infants were killed, per CNN.
  • The family has previously been targeted by organized-crime groups for their relative wealth. One of its most prominent members was murdered in 2009 after speaking out against drug traffickers who kidnapped his younger brother, notes the Post.

What they're saying:

  • President Trump tweeted in response to the deaths: "If Mexico needs or requests help in cleaning out these monsters, the United States stands ready, willing & able to get involved and do the job quickly and effectively. The great new President of Mexico has made this a big issue, but the cartels have become so large and powerful that you sometimes need an army to defeat an army!"
  • Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador thanked Trump for the offer, but said Mexico would find those behind the attack — "This is a matter of our sovereignty," per the Washington Post.
  • Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) tweeted, "The U.S. must work with Mexican officials to hold accountable those responsible for this senseless violence." Romney's father was born to American parents living in a Mexican Mormon colony, according to the Washington Examiner's David Mark.

Go deeper: Mexico's López Obrador is delivering the populism he promised

Editor's note: This post has been updated to clarify that it was Romney's father who was born in Mexico.

Go deeper

Narrowing the employee divide

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

Companies are narrowing the blue- and white-collar experience as they're forced to adapt to a worker-led market.

Driving the news: Basic office tools and concepts like corporate communications and schedule flexibility are migrating to frontline operations through investments in technology.

17 mins ago - Health

U.S. to buy 500 million more Pfizer doses to share with the world

A nurse fills a syringe with a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Photo: Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

The Biden administration is planning to purchase 500 million more Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine doses to donate to the world, officials said in an op-ed Wednesday.

Why it matters: The move represents a big step toward making the U.S. a major global vaccine supplier just as China has ramped up exports of its Sinopharm, Sinovac and CanSino vaccines, which can be stored at normal refrigerator temperatures.

D.C.'s building boom grinds to a halt

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The decades-long building boom that remade Washington D.C. is screeching to a halt, undone by broader construction trends and the legacy of the post-pandemic workplace.

Why it matters: Dizzying construction has reshaped the city, reinvigorated downtown and created bustling new communities.