Donald Trump attending an event for the National Rifle Association. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Trump made 10,111 false or misleading statements over the first 828 days of his presidency, according to a Washington Post analysis.

By the numbers: Over the last seven months, Trump has averaged 23 false claims per day, buoyed by his statements during campaign-style rallies and tweets. The Post found that about 20% of Trump's false claims are on immigration, including the fact that he's falsely claimed 160 times that a wall is being built along the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • Trump made 171 false claims from April 25 to April 27, which the Post says is more than "any single month in the first five months of his presidency."
  • Trump's 45-minute phone interview with Fox News' Sean Hannity last week included 45 false claims — one per minute.
  • 22% of Trump's false claims come during the president's campaign-style rallies, and his Saturday rally in Green Bay, Wis. to counter-program the White House Correspondents' Dinner featured 61 false claims.

Go deeper: The evolution of Trump's collusion denials

Go deeper

Pelosi: Birx "enabled" Trump on coronavirus misinformation

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told CNN on Monday she does not have confidence in White House coronavirus task force coordinator Deborah Birx because "she has enabled" President Trump to spread coronavirus misinformation.

What she's saying: "I don't have confidence in anyone who stands there while the president says, 'Swallow Lysol and it's going to cure your virus,'" Pelosi told host Jim Scuitto.

13 mins ago - Technology

Google launches $349 Pixel 4a

Google

Google on Monday launched its long-expected Pixel 4a, a $349 device that brings key features of the company's flagship smartphone to a more affordable price point.

Why it matters: Google saw surprisingly strong demand for last year's "a" model and having a broader range of products allows the company to reach more parts of the market.

A wild weekend for Microsoft's play for TikTok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

While its Big Tech rivals were testifying in front of a congressional antitrust committee last week, Microsoft was negotiating what could be the largest — and most politically perilous — tech acquisition of 2020.

The state of play: The hullabaloo surrounding Microsoft picking up TikTok has undergone a flurry of twists and turns over the weekend, as both the White House and the tech giant reacted in real time.