Jul 30, 2019

Judge dismisses DNC lawsuit against Trump campaign, WikiLeaks and Russia

Julian Assange gestures to the media from a police car on April 11, 2019 in London. Photo: Jack Taylor/Getty Images

U.S. District Judge John Koeltl has dismissed the Democratic National Committee's lawsuit against the Russian government, WikiLeaks and the Trump campaign.

The big picture: Tuesday's dismissal means the DNC can't bring another action on this same claim. Koeltl writes that "the primary wrongdoer in this alleged criminal enterprise is undoubtably the Russian Federation," which "cannot be sued in the courts of the United States for governmental actions ... just as the United States government generally cannot be sued in courts abroad for its actions."

  • The judge also notes that the "second-level participants" in the alleged activity — which include the Trump campaign, WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, Roger Stone and others — cannot be held liable for disseminating hacked emails because they are shielded by the same First Amendment protections that apply to the media.
  • Koeltl also rejected the Trump campaign's attempt to sanction the DNC and did not consider special counsel Robert Mueller's report in his ruling, per Courthouse News.

Read the filing:

Go deeper: DNC sues Trump, WikiLeaks and Russia over 2016 election

Editor's note: This story has been updated to show that Koeltl rejected the Trump campaign's attempt to sanction the DNC and did not refer to the Mueller report in his ruling.

Go deeper

Updated 11 mins ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

The scene near the 5th police precinct during a demonstration calling for justice for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Saturday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd outside the CNN Center on May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protestors.

Why it matters: The incidents show how easy it can be for the media to entangled in the stories they cover, especially during a time of civil unrest.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.