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Amid the coronavirus pandemic, video conference tool Zoom has become the go-to app for bringing home everything from work to school — and now it's being used for political fundraising.

What's new: On Tuesday, Silicon Valley technologists used Zoom to host the Democratic National Committee's first virtual fundraiser, which featured DNC technology chief Nell Thomas and Deck Technologies founder Max Woods. 

  • The event was initially planned to be in-person, but like so much else, went virtual, co-host and venture capitalist Roy Bahat tells Axios. 

What they're saying: "We've hosted a lot of fundraisers since 2016, and it was better than a lot of them," says Bahat of Tuesday's video call. "It's way easier to get the expert to you … all the guests could come from wherever." 

  • At its peak, about 75 people were tuned into the event, which featured a presentation from Thomas about the DNC's tech infrastructure. 
  • The hosts posted a link for submitting payments into the Zoom dashboards and directed participants to it. Bahat said that made it much easier to actually collect donations than at in-person events.
  • Bahat hasn't received fundraising results from the DNC yet, but says that with this first Zoom-hosted event, the hosts were more focused on getting every participant to donate than on the total amount. 

The big picture: Campaigns have been increasingly using tech over the years to reach voters and coordinate activities, but the coronavirus pandemic could force fully virtual measures like social distancing to remain in place for months. The presidential election is a little over seven months away.

Go deeper: Campaigns turn to texting as coronavirus spreads

Go deeper

McConnell: Senate has "more than sufficient time" to process Supreme Court nomination

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said in a floor speech Monday that the chamber has "more than sufficient time" to confirm a replacement for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the election, and accused Democrats of preparing "an even more appalling sequel" to the fight over Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Why it matters: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has said "nothing is off the table next year" if Republicans push ahead with the confirmation vote before November, vowing alongside Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) to use "every procedural tool available to us to ensure that we buy ourselves the time necessary."

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 31,120,980 — Total deaths: 961,656— Total recoveries: 21,287,328Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 6,819,651 — Total deaths: 199,606 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  5. Business: Unemployment concerns are growing.
  6. World: "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Democrats on Monday released their proposal for short-term legislation to fund the government through December 11.

Why it matters: This is Congress' chief legislative focus before the election. They must pass a continuing resolution (CR) before midnight on Oct. 1 to avoid a government shutdown — something both Hill leaders and the White House have claimed is off the table.