Jun 21, 2018

Where the DNC is targeting unregistered minority voters

Tom Perez, the DNC chairman. Photo: Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee is investing $2.5 million to turn out minority voters from St. Louis to Maine for this November's midterm election, per NYT's Astead Herndon.

Why it matters: This might be the party's largest plan yet to target minorities, specifically those who don't typically vote, in a midterm election year. As the base of the Democratic Party, these voters could help Democrats take back the House.

The 2018 map: Democrats are hoping to turn out Asian and Latino voters in the West and Southwest; African American voters in Milwaukee, St. Louis and Detroit; and millennial voters in New Hampshire and Maine.

  • The party will spend $1.2 million to hire organizers in 16 states across the country where they saw a decline in turnout among liberal voters in 2016 (like Ohio, Wisconsin and Michigan).
  • The DNC tech team will be revamping the way they reach out to these unregistered voters — young voters, people of color, and those who live in rural areas — for the 2018 and 2020 elections.
  • This strategy will help Democrats invest early in these minority communities — a contrast from the criticism they often face, which is that the Democratic Party only engages minority voters right before an election.

The big picture: Democrats have had a hard time relying on minority voters to turn out in recent years when Barack Obama wasn't on the ballot. There was a 7% drop-off in black voter turnout in 2016 compared to 2012. "We do a good job with our known universe of voters," a national Democratic source told Axios, "but we've not always made sure that we’re doing outreach to low frequency voters."

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Scoop: German foreign minister to travel to Israel with warning on annexation

Heiko Maas. Photo: Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas is expected to travel to Israel next week to warn that there will be consequences if Israeli leaders move forward with plans to annex parts of the West Bank, Israeli officials and European diplomats tell me.

Why it matters: Israeli and European officials agree that if Israel goes ahead with unilateral annexation, the EU will respond with sanctions.

Minneapolis will ban police chokeholds following George Floyd's death

A memorial for George Floyd at the site of his death in Minneapolis. Photo: Steel Brooks/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Minneapolis has agreed to ban the use of police chokeholds and will require nearby officers to act to stop them in the wake of George Floyd's death, AP reports.

Why it matters: The agreement between the city and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, which has launched an investigation into Floyd's death while in police custody, will be enforceable in court.