An electric wheelchair and walker. Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

State authorities are warning of an alleged scam involving DNA tests that's targeted to low-income and senior-living communities, Bloomberg reports.

How it works: The alleged scammers visit these communities and offer to perform DNA tests. They then collect information from people in government health programs, like Medicare and Medicaid, that can be used to bill the government for unneeded medical care or to commit identify theft.

  • For example, in Kentucky, there have been reports of people showing up in a van and offering to pay Medicaid recipients $20 to take a DNA swab and to get their insurance information.

The backdrop: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced last year that Medicare would cover genetic testing for cancer.

Go deeper: Genetic testing firms share your DNA data more than you think

Go deeper

Facebook's latest headache: Its own employees' posts

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook’s rules for what people can say on the world’s largest social network have been a long-term headache for the company, but now it faces similar troubles on the internal network its own staff uses.

Driving the news: As political arguments on Facebook’s employee discussion boards have grown more heated and divisive, the company ordered new restrictions on the forums earlier this month, which run on Facebook’s Workplace platform.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
45 mins ago - Energy & Environment

How a conservative Supreme Court would impact climate policy

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Amy Coney Barrett's likely ascension to the Supreme Court would affect climate policy beyond shoving the court rightward in the abstract.

Why it matters: If Joe Biden wins the presidential election, his regulations and potential new climate laws would face litigation that could reach the high court.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 33,138,963 — Total deaths: 998,380 — Total recoveries: 22,953,639Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 7,116,455 — Total deaths: 204,762 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. States: 3 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week
  4. Health: The childless vaccine — Why kids get less severe coronavirus infections.
  5. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases