Sens. Richard Durbin (C) and Todd Young talk about their proposed "Tobacco to 21" legislation during a news conference, May 8, Washington, D.C. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) sent acting FDA commissioner Ned Sharpless a biting letter on Wednesday, writing that he believes Sharpless has "no intention" of addressing the youth e-cigarette epidemic after a meeting between the two on May 14.

What he's saying: Durbin warned Sharpless not to make the same mistakes as his predecessor Scott Gottlieb by underestimating the impact of rampant youth vaping. "I write to again reiterate the specific actions that FDA should be taking, today, to protect children from a lifetime of addiction."

Context: Durbin and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) introduced legislation to restrict flavored e-cigarettes in March. Gottlieb also worked to ban flavored cigars and threatened to limit flavored vape pen sales, and previously described the use of e-cigarettes as a "public health epidemic."

Read the letter:

Go deeper: The FDA's formal vaping proposal is finally here

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Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
4 hours ago - Science

The murder hornets are here

A braver man than me holds a speciment of the Asian giant hornet. Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Entomologists in Washington state on Thursday discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S.

Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.