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Devin Nunes. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A judge determined on Wednesday that Twitter is immune from House Intelligence Ranking Member Devin Nunes' (R-Calif.) defamation suit.

Catch up quick: Judicial circuit Judge John Marshall's ruling did not find that Twitter is a publisher or speaker of the content posted by users to its site, or that Twitter is biased against conservatives.

  • The ruling cited Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which shields online services from liability for what users post.

Flashback: Axios spoke to legal experts last year who did not think Nunes would be able to show that any of the insults made on Twitter by anonymous users "Devin Nunes' Mom" and "Devin Nunes' Cow" constituted defamation.

What they're saying: "Twitter strongly believes the court made the right decision today to dismiss the claims raised by Congressman Nunes. Twitter enforces the Twitter Rules impartially for everyone who uses our service around the world, regardless of their background or political affiliation," Twitter spokesperson Catherine Hill said in a statement.

  • Nunes' office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Go deeper: Devin Nunes suing Twitter over anti-conservative "shadow bans"

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Aug 24, 2020 - Technology

Twitter and Facebook’s contrasting approaches to flagging Trump

Twitter on Sunday flagged election-related misinformation from President Trump as violating platform rules, while Facebook took a softer approach.

Why it matters: It's the latest example of the stark contrast in how the two sites handle controversial posts from the president. The pressure on both companies is likely only to intensify as the presidential election draws closer.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

The winners and losers of the pandemic holiday season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic has upended Thanksgiving and the shopping season that the holiday kicks off, creating a new crop of economic winners and losers.

The big picture: Just as it has exacerbated inequality in every other facet of American life, the coronavirus pandemic is deepening inequities in the business world, with the biggest and most powerful companies rapidly outpacing the smaller players.

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.