Trump speaks with DeSantis at Palm Beach International Airport, Florida, Sept. 8. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) plans to terminate a Trump program that supports unemployment benefits for out-of-work Floridians because the state's jobless program doesn't have the resources to qualify for the federal assistance, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Florida is among the first states to stop the program because of the cost. The state doesn't pay its unemployed workers enough to meet the 25% matching requirement, so people will lose out on an extra $300 a week made possible by President Trump's executive order, Politico notes.

The big picture: The move to scrap the federal assistance comes just eight weeks before the 2020 election. Trump's re-election path has to go through Florida, Axios White House editor Margaret Talev writes.

The state of play: DeSantis said last week that Florida didn't have the "capacity" to accept the $300 payments from the Trump administration.

  • The program requires that states spend at least $100 per person per week on its own jobless benefits to qualify, Politico writes.
  • Florida has one of the weakest unemployment programs in the U.S.

What to watch: DeSantis is expected to put roughly $6 billion worth of CARES Act money that Congress sent to Florida toward the state’s COVID-19 response and fill in the budget.

Go deeper

Oct 19, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Judge blocks Trump administration plan to cut food stamps to unemployed Americans

Food stamps recipients doing a big once-a-month shopping trip on the day their monthly SNAP account is re-funded. Photo: Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Sunday called Trump administration plans to cut food stamp benefits for almost 700,000 jobless Americans "arbitrary and capricious" as she blocked the move, per the Washington Post.

Details: The rule at issue "radically and abruptly alters decades of regulatory practice, leaving states scrambling and exponentially increasing food insecurity for tens of thousands of Americans," said Chief U.S. District Judge Beryl A. Howell, of D.C., CNN notes.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
49 mins ago - Economy & Business

CEO confidence skyrockets on expectations of layoffs and wage cuts

U.S. consumers remain uncertain about the economic environment but CEOs are feeling incredibly confident, the latest survey from the Conference Board shows.

Why it matters: Confidence among chief executives jumped 19 points from its last reading in July, rising above the 50-point threshold that reflects more positive than negative responses for the first time since 2018.

Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.