Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Incoming House Democratic leaders are being warned to emphasize the findings of their Trump administration investigations rather than the mechanics, like subpoenas and document requests.

The big picture: "Show — don’t tell," says a new progressive strategy blueprint from Navigator Research, a collaboration of two Democratic firms, Global Strategy Group and GBA Strategies. "[T]oo much focus on the investigative process rather than the findings could tarnish public perceptions."

Why it matters: The polling shows that with the country so closely divided, Democrats could easily overplay their hands as they revel in their new clout.Polling by the firms found "far lower" support from independents and battleground district voters when the emphasis was on Democrats "[using] their new congressional powers" rather than "[following] the facts."

  • That was the most actionable of the takeaways from 1,269 online interviews with registered voters, with a heavier sample from 2018 House battlegrounds.

This word cloud resulted from a question about what issue or issues should be the top priority of the next Congress:

Navigator Research

Respondents were asked to highlight the most convincing parts of this paragraph, and the words in larger text were chosen most often:

Navigator Research

P.S. Iowa and New Hampshire in full swing:

  • "In the two weeks since the election, potential White House contenders have intensified their effort to recruit operatives who could help them navigate an Iowa campaign." AP's Tom Beaumont reports from Des Moines.
  • "Even before they announce their White House intentions, New Hampshire’s ambitious neighbors [from Massachusetts and Vermont, with Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey fighting for a foothold] are in the midst of a shadow campaign to shape the nation’s first presidential primary," per AP's Steve Peoples.

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8 mins ago - Health

At least 48 local public health leaders have quit or been fired during pandemic

Former California public health director Dr. Sonia Angell on Feb. 27 in Sacramento, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

At least 48 local and state-level public health leaders have retired, resigned or been fired across 23 states since April, according to a review by the AP and Kaiser Health News.

Driving the news: California public health director Dr. Sonia Angell resigned on Sunday without explanation, a few days after the state fixed a delay in reporting coronavirus test results that had affected reopenings for schools and businesses, AP reports.

House will not hold votes until Sept. 14 unless stimulus deal is reached

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) announced Monday that the House will not hold any floor votes until Sept. 14, though members will remain on 24-hour notice to return to Washington in case a deal on coronavirus stimulus is reached.

Why it matters: Democrats and the Trump administration remain deadlocked and have not met since negotiations broke down without a deal on Friday.

Updated 51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 19,936,547 — Total deaths: 732,467 — Total recoveries — 12,144,510Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 5,063,770 — Total deaths: 163,156 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Business: Richer Americans are more comfortable eating out.
  4. Public health: How America can do smarter testing.
  5. Sports: The cost of kids losing gym class — College football is on the brink.
  6. World: Europe's CDC recommends new restrictions amid "true resurgence in cases."