Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Even before President Trump's shutdown remarks on Saturday, Democrats and aides on the Hill were dismissing his planned shutdown compromise offer as inadequate.

As first reported by Axios, Trump was expected to make two offers to Democrats in exchange for $5.7 billion in funds for a border wall: Extend DACA protections for Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, and extend the legal status of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) holders. Half an hour before the speech, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement: "Unfortunately, initial reports make clear that his proposal is a compilation of several previously rejected initiatives, each of which is unacceptable and in total, do not represent a good faith effort to restore certainty to people's lives."

Democratic Whip Dick Durbin also issued a statement:

"First, President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell must open the government today.  Second, I cannot support the proposed offer as reported and do not believe it can pass the Senate. Third, I am ready to sit down at any time after the government is opened and work to resolve all outstanding issues."
— Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)

A Democratic aide told Axios: "Dems were not consulted on this and have rejected similar overtures previously."

  • "The BRIDGE Act does not fully protect Dreamers and is not a permanent solution."
  • "This is not a compromise as it includes the same wasteful, ineffective $5.7 billion wall demand that shut down the government in the first place."
  • "This cannot pass the House or Senate."
  • "The President must agree to re-open government and join Democrats to negotiate on border security measures that work and not an expensive and ineffective wall that the President promised Mexico would pay for."

What we're watching: Whether any moderate Democrats break ranks and ask their leaders to reconsider.

Be smart: The risk Democrats face, especially moderates, is that the deal may seem appealing or reasonable to many independents who voted for them.

Go deeper: Trump expected to propose DACA-TPS immigration compromise

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Americans reflect on Independence Day amid racism reckoning

A Black Lives Matter banner and a United States flag on the facade of the U.S. embassy building in Seoul, South Korea. Photo: Simon Shin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

America's leaders are rethinking how they view Independence Day, as the country reckons with the historic, unequal treatment of people of color during a pandemic which has disproportionately affected nonwhite Americans.

Why it matters: The country’s legacy of racism has come into sharp focus in the weeks of protests following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody. From Confederate statues to Mount Rushmore, Americans are reexamining the symbols and traditions they elevate and the history behind them.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 2,788,395 — Total deaths: 129,306 — Total recoveries: 790,404 — Total tested: 34,213,497Map.
  3. States: ICU beds in Arizona's hot spot reach near capacity.
  4. Public health: The states where face coverings are mandatory Fauci says it has been a "very disturbing week" for the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.
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Washington Redskins to review team name amid public pressure

Photo: Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The Washington Redskins have announced they will be conducting a review of the team's name after mounting pressure from the public and corporate sponsors.

Why it matters: This review is the first formal step the Redskins are taking since the debate surrounding the name first began. It comes after weeks of discussions between the team and the NFL, the team said.