Sens. Schumer, Booker, Franken and Warren. (Photos: AP)

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein has been a major donor to Democratic candidates. Now, the candidates he supported financially are giving away that money to charity after it was revealed Weinstein has been accused of sexual harassment by multiple women.

Many of the senators' spokespersons said they learned of Weinstein's behavior yesterday when the news broke.

Sen. Patrick Leahy (VT): Donating $5600 to the Women's Fund at the Vermont Community Foundation, specifically the Change the Story Initiative.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (CT): Donating $5400 to Connecticut Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

Sen. Martin Heinrich (NM): Donating $5400 to Community Against Violence, a non-profit organization in New Mexico.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (MA): Donating $5000 to Casa Myrna, a non-profit in Boston.

Sen. Corey Booker (NJ): Donating $7800 to the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault, a nonprofit charity organization.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (NY): Donating $16,200 to "several charities supporting women," per a Schumer spokesperson.

Sen. Al Franken (MN): Donating $19,600 to Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center.

The Democratic National Committee is donating more than "$30,000 in contributions from Weinstein to EMILY's List, Emerge America and Higher Heights," DNC communications director told The Daily Beast's Scott Bixby.

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