Feb 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Daniel Goldman to depart House Intelligence Committee

Goldman and House Intel Chairman Adam Schiff. Photo: Shawn Thew/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Daniel Goldman, the former federal prosecutor who questioned witnesses during the impeachment inquiry as counsel to Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee, is stepping down, CNN reports.

Why it matters: The departure reflects the de-escalation of House Democrats' investigations into President Trump in the aftermath of his impeachment acquittal. Democratic leaders have left open the question of whether they will continue their Ukraine probe, including by subpoenaing former national security adviser John Bolton.

  • Goldman is the third top Democratic lawyer to leave since the end of the impeachment hearings — Barry Berke and Norm Eisen left the House Judiciary Committee earlier this year.

What he's saying: "I'm indebted to my colleagues for working tirelessly in pursuit of that objective. While I am eager to return to New York to spend some much-needed time with my family, I know that the committee's work will continue apace under Chairman Schiff's leadership," Goldman told CNN.

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Why it matters: The memoir, which claims that President Trump linked Ukraine aid to investigations of his political rivals, was at the heart of Trump's impeachment inquiry — although Bolton ultimately never testified before the House or Senate. The Trump administration says that it is reviewing the book's content to ensure it does not endanger national security, though Bolton publicly worried last month that the White House may use the review process to suppress its publication.

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What's happening: In a letter to Attorney General Bill Barr sent Friday, House Democrats requested interviews with 15 current and former Justice Department officials as part of an effort to investigate allegations of Trump interference into the DOJ.