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A Huawei logo. Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Bloomberg reported Tuesday that Vodafone's Italian division had discovered "backdoors" in its Huawei-brand telecommunications equipment in 2011 and 2012.

But, but, but: The story did not play well in the security community, where the evidence is seen as insufficient to the central claims. It didn't make a strong case that the "backdoor" was anything more than a minor, unintentional problem. Vodafone's official stance was it wasn't.

Reality check: The story was based on internal memos leaked to Bloomberg.

  • The "backdoors" were a number of security flaws that Vodafone found in security testing. All hardware and software have security vulnerabilities, so that doesn't seem particularly malicious.

Details: One "backdoor" was Telnet, an extremely common communications protocol that many hardware manufacturers use for configuration. While Huawei used the industry standard way to make Telnet inaccessible via the wider internet, Vodafone has a policy of not allowing Telnet.

  • When Huawei fixed the equipment, it claimed it resolved the Telnet issue, but Telnet was still accessible.
  • According to the memos, Huawei said that Telnet couldn't be entirely removed from the router.

To be clear: This chain of events is common for manufacturers. It's hard to make the leap to claiming this was a backdoor based on the story.

  • This is where the story stopped.

However: Bloomberg may not have given the full account of the technical reasoning that the Telnet issue was intentional.

  • Bloomberg did not release the memos, so it's hard to verify any technical details.
  • Still, according to Stefano Zanero, an expert quoted in the story who did see the memos, the memos make Huawei seem sketchier than the story suggested.

According to Zanero, the following was left out of the story:

  • The Telnet service wasn't in guides explaining how the hardware worked.
  • The passwords to the Telnet service couldn't be changed, meaning the manufacturer would always know how to hack the hardware.
  • It accepted connections in a nonstandard way, which made it seem hidden.
  • The Telnet was successfully removed once but reintroduced later.

The bottom line: It still isn't a smoking gun. Even with Zanero's elaborations, to most of the security community, this has read like Vodafone employees attributing malice to incompetence.

Go deeper: Vodafone denies Bloomberg report on security flaws in Huawei equipment

Go deeper

CDC lets child migrant shelters fill to 100% despite COVID concern

Intensive care tents at overflow shelter in Carrizo Springs, Texas. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control is allowing shelters handling child migrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border to expand to full capacity, abandoning a requirement that they stay near 50% to inhibit the spread of the coronavirus, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The fact that the country's premier health advisory agency is permitting a change in COVID-19 protocols indicates the scale of the immigration crisis. A draft memo obtained by Axios conceded "facilities should plan for and expect to have COVID-19 cases."

8 Senate Democrats vote against adding $15 minimum wage to COVID relief

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Eight Democratic senators on Friday voted against Sen. Bernie Sanders' amendment to ignore a ruling by the Senate parliamentarian and add a $15 minimum wage provision to the $1.9 trillion COVID relief package.

The state of play: The vote was held open for hours on Friday afternoon — even after every senator had voted — due to a standoff in negotiations over the next amendments that the Senate will take up.

CDC: Easing mask mandates led to higher COVID cases and deaths

Customer at a supermarket chain in Austin, Texas. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

Easing mask restrictions and on-site dining have increased COVID-19 cases and deaths, according to a study out Friday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Why it matters: The report's findings converge with actions from governors this week easing mask mandates and announcing plans to reopen nonessential businesses like restaurants.