New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said at a press briefing Sunday that not enough New Yorkers are getting tested for the coronavirus, even though the state has significantly scaled up its capacity.

Driving the news: Cuomo announced that New York is expanding its eligibility for diagnostic testing to include anyone who is returning to work as part of the state's "phase one" reopening — which includes people in construction, manufacturing and curbside retail.

The following categories are also eligible to receive coronavirus tests:

  • Any individual with symptoms.
  • Any individual who has had contact with someone who has tested positive.
  • Any individual who is subject to a precautionary or mandatory quarantine.
  • Any individual employed as a health care worker, nursing home worker or first responder.
  • Any essential worker who directly interacts with the public while working.

The big picture: Cuomo, who had a doctor perform a test on him live at the press briefing in order to demonstrate how "fast and easy" it is, said that New York now has 700 testing sites — many of which are only processing one-third of their total testing capacity per day.

  • "That is the whole test," Cuomo said after the doctor administered the test up his nose. "I'm not in pain. I'm not in discomfort. Closing my eyes was a moment of relaxation. There is no reason why you should not get the test. And you don't even have to be New York tough to take that test."

The big picture: New York has so far conducted 1.3 million tests, with more than 350,000 confirmed cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

  • 28,232 people have died from the virus in New York, while 60,796 people have recovered.

Go deeper: Cuomo says some New York regions have met criteria to reopen

Go deeper

Aug 10, 2020 - Health

How to do smarter coronavirus testing

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

With testing once again a huge vulnerability to America’s coronavirus response, public health officials are calling for a revamped strategy that features the use of more tests, even if they're imperfect.

Why it matters: The system is overwhelmed by the demand for tests, and yet prolific testing is key to identifying asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic coronavirus cases. Experts say the solution is smarter testing — which doesn't require perfect accuracy.

Aug 9, 2020 - Health

Ohio governor urges Americans not to lose faith in testing after false positive

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that Americans shouldn't think testing for the coronavirus is "not reliable or doesn't work," after he received a false positive result from an antigen test last week.

Why it matters: DeWine is one of six governors who have agreed to pool their resources, along with the Rockefeller Foundation, in order to acquire 3 million antigen tests amid severe delays and the lack of a national testing strategy.

Updated Aug 9, 2020 - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Does not include probable deaths from New York City; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The number of COVID-19 cases recorded in the U.S. surpassed 5 million on Sunday morning, per Johns Hopkins data.

The big picture: Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden noted in an emailed statement that 5 million "is more than the entire population of Alabama — or of more than half the states in our union, for that matter," as he blamed President Trump for his handling of the pandemic.