May 17, 2020 - Health

Cuomo demonstrates live coronavirus test at press briefing

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said at a press briefing Sunday that not enough New Yorkers are getting tested for the coronavirus, even though the state has significantly scaled up its capacity.

Driving the news: Cuomo announced that New York is expanding its eligibility for diagnostic testing to include anyone who is returning to work as part of the state's "phase one" reopening — which includes people in construction, manufacturing and curbside retail.

The following categories are also eligible to receive coronavirus tests:

  • Any individual with symptoms.
  • Any individual who has had contact with someone who has tested positive.
  • Any individual who is subject to a precautionary or mandatory quarantine.
  • Any individual employed as a health care worker, nursing home worker or first responder.
  • Any essential worker who directly interacts with the public while working.

The big picture: Cuomo, who had a doctor perform a test on him live at the press briefing in order to demonstrate how "fast and easy" it is, said that New York now has 700 testing sites — many of which are only processing one-third of their total testing capacity per day.

  • "That is the whole test," Cuomo said after the doctor administered the test up his nose. "I'm not in pain. I'm not in discomfort. Closing my eyes was a moment of relaxation. There is no reason why you should not get the test. And you don't even have to be New York tough to take that test."

The big picture: New York has so far conducted 1.3 million tests, with more than 350,000 confirmed cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

  • 28,232 people have died from the virus in New York, while 60,796 people have recovered.

Go deeper: Cuomo says some New York regions have met criteria to reopen

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Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in Washington, D.C., and New York City. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) slammed the New York Police Department late Tuesday following reports of police kettling in protesters on Manhattan Bridge.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.