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Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty

The governors of Oregon and New Mexico issued two-week, partial lockdowns in their respective states on Friday.

Why it matters: The U.S. has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases over the last few weeks. Though officials have hesitated to reinstate the sweeping measures they enforced during the first wave, states are facing increased pressure as case numbers rise and hospital beds fill.

The state of play: The orders in both states will close non-essential businesses like gyms and entertainment venues and allow only take-out for restaurants and bars.

  • Retail outlets, grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open but at limited capacity, while churches will be required to host people in reduced numbers.
  • Oregon’s partial lockdown, set to start on Nov. 18, also limits social gatherings to six people.
  • Schools that “meet the metrics” will stay open, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said at a press briefing Friday.
  • That will not change in New Mexico, either, when the state enters lockdown Nov. 16.

Where it stands: In the past week, Oregon has seen a 104% increase in average cases per day compared to two weeks earlier. Case rates are topping 1,000 daily, according to Brown.

  • COVID-19 hospitalizations in New Mexico have risen 231% over the past month. In the last two weeks, COVID-19 deaths jumped by 281%.
  • Renee Edwards, chief medical officer at Oregon Health and Science University, called Brown's order "difficult to hear but necessary."

Context: Other states are also beginning to ramp up restrictions despite reluctance to issue full lockdowns.

  • New York has closed nighttime bars and restaurants and limited private gatherings to no more than 10 people. New York City is considering shutting down in-person schooling as early as Monday.
  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint message on Friday urging out-of-state travelers to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

Go deeper

Updated 7 hours ago - World

Oxford University says its coronavirus vaccine is up to 90% effective

A scientist working during at the Oxford Vaccine Group's laboratory facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford, England, in June. Photo: Steve Parsons/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The University of Oxford announced Monday that a COVID-19 vaccine it's developed with AstraZeneca is 70.4% effective in preventing people from developing symptoms, per interim data from Phase 3 trials.

Why it matters: The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is shown to work in different age groups and can be stored at fridge temperature. It is much cheaper than other vaccines in development and is part of the global COVAX initiative, designed to ensure doses go where they're most needed.

In photos: Americans wait at food banks before Thanksgiving

Residents line up in their cars at a food distribution site in Clermont, Fla., Nov. 21. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Thousands of Americans waited in long lines at food banks in the week before Thanksgiving to pick up turkeys, canned goods, broccoli and other vegetables.

Why it matters: As the holiday season approaches, families across the U.S. are in need of food assistance due to chronic unemployment and economic hardship caused by COVID-19 — and many food pantries already served an unprecedented number of people this spring.

Operation Warp Speed leader: COVID vaccine push is "isolated from a political environment"

Moncef Slaoui in the Rose Garden on Nov. 13. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Moncef Slaoui, the White House's top scientific adviser to Operation Warp Speed, told Chuck Todd on "Meet the Press" on Sunday that the Trump administration's efforts to accelerate the development of a coronavirus vaccine is "isolated from a political environment" and that a change in administration "doesn't, frankly, make a difference" on its efficacy.

Why it matters: Slaoui told ABC's George Stephanopoulos on Sunday that he has not yet had contact with Joe Biden's transition team, as the president-elect prepares to inherit one of the country's biggest crises ahead of an expected vaccine distribution effort that would require massive logistical cooperation between states and the federal government.