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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty

The governors of Oregon and New Mexico issued two-week, partial lockdowns in their respective states on Friday.

Why it matters: The U.S. has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases over the last few weeks. Though officials have hesitated to reinstate the sweeping measures they enforced during the first wave, states are facing increased pressure as case numbers rise and hospital beds fill.

The state of play: The orders in both states will close non-essential businesses like gyms and entertainment venues and allow only take-out for restaurants and bars.

  • Retail outlets, grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open but at limited capacity, while churches will be required to host people in reduced numbers.
  • Oregon’s partial lockdown, set to start on Nov. 18, also limits social gatherings to six people.
  • Schools that “meet the metrics” will stay open, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said at a press briefing Friday.
  • That will not change in New Mexico, either, when the state enters lockdown Nov. 16.

Where it stands: In the past week, Oregon has seen a 104% increase in average cases per day compared to two weeks earlier. Case rates are topping 1,000 daily, according to Brown.

  • COVID-19 hospitalizations in New Mexico have risen 231% over the past month. In the last two weeks, COVID-19 deaths jumped by 281%.
  • Renee Edwards, chief medical officer at Oregon Health and Science University, called Brown's order "difficult to hear but necessary."

Context: Other states are also beginning to ramp up restrictions despite reluctance to issue full lockdowns.

  • New York has closed nighttime bars and restaurants and limited private gatherings to no more than 10 people. New York City is considering shutting down in-person schooling as early as Monday.
  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint message on Friday urging out-of-state travelers to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

Go deeper

Jan 29, 2021 - Health

NYC set to restart indoor dining in February, weddings in March

Outdoor dining in New York City in January. Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that if the current coronavirus positivity in New York City holds, indoor dining will reopen at 25% capacity on Feb. 14, one of the busiest dining days of the year.

Why it matters: The forced closure of indoor dining in December caused major backlash, as New York's struggling restaurant industry had already been hit hard by pandemic restrictions. Restaurants will still be required to close at 1o p.m.

Updated 14 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Jan 30, 2021 - World

Germany to impose travel restrictions to curb spread of coronavirus variants

Border police officers check passports and COVID-19 tests at Frankfurt Airport. Photo: Thomas Lohnes via Getty Images

Germany announced Friday that it was imposing new travel restrictions in an effort to curb the spread of more contagious coronavirus variants.

Details: All non-German residents traveling from countries deemed "areas of variant concern," including the United Kingdom, South Africa, Portugal, Ireland, Brazil, Lesotho and Eswatini, will be banned from entering the country, even if they test negative for the coronavirus.