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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Axios' Mike Allen, Niala Boodhoo and Caitlin Owens hosted a conversation on the global response to two pandemics — AIDS and COVID-19, featuring Every Mother Counts founder Christy Turlington Burns, Churches Health Association of Zambia Head of Advocacy Yoram Siame and ONE Campaign President and CEO Gayle E. Smith.

Christy Turlington Burns discussed maternal health in the U.S. and the impact of COVID-19, highlighting how the risk of complications during pregnancy is especially high for Black and Indigenous women.

  • On the role of midwives and doulas in maternity care: "There are very few states in the country that adequately support these types of health care workers who we know make a huge difference in the impact of childbirth for any woman, let alone a woman who may have a chronic health condition or be marginalized."

Yoram Siame unpacked Zambia's fight against COVID-19 and the country's investment in public health safety.

  • On COVID-19's impact on Zambia: "Zambia is a landlocked country, which means that we depend on our neighbors for most of the goods and services. And when those countries go into lockdown, it means that our supply is cut off. And this has a big impact on economic activity."
  • How COVID-19 presents a challenge for treating existing diseases: "We are living in an environment where we don't have the number of health workers that we need. COVID-19 means that this literal human resource is shared between us and issues like HIV, TB, malaria, and non-communicable diseases like cancer, which are not going away."

Gayle E. Smith discussed how the COVID-19 pandemic has diverted resources from efforts to care for patients with AIDS and HIV and malaria, and the challenges of fighting two epidemics.

  • On the unique bipartisan support for fighting AIDS: "There's a fair amount of division floating around Washington, so to know that ending this epidemic...is still a priority and still a place where Democrats and Republicans have shown that they can work together is encouraging."

Donate to (RED) and help fight both pandemics.

Thank you Bank of America for sponsoring this event.

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Jan 21, 2021 - Health

Tackling mental health via app

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A tech startup is helping providers monitor their patients' moods and mental health status through a remote app.

Why it matters: Mental health is an unaddressed crisis in the U.S., and it's only gotten worse during COVID-19. NeuroFlow can help users track their own mental health while making it easier for health care professionals to identify when their patients are in crisis.

Updated 3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: How data and the pandemic have democratized the "high-performance lifestyle — "Twindemic" averted as flu reports plummet amid coronavirus crisis
  2. Vaccine: Pfizer begins study on 3rd vaccine dose as booster shot against new strains — Republicans are least likely to want the coronavirus vaccine
  3. U.S. news: California surpasses 50,000 deaths COVID-19 deaths, more than any other state — Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter return to church after receiving COVID-19 vaccines
  4. Local: Public transit ridership in Twin Cities dropped 53% amid pandemic — Data firm predicts "complete chaos" in next phases of Florida's vaccine rolloutAlaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy tests positive for the coronavirus

Acting Capitol Police chief: Phone logs show Jan. 6 National Guard approval was delayed

Pittman at a congressional tribute for fallen officer Brian Sicknick. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Acting U.S. Capitol Police chief Yogananda Pittman testified on Thursday that cellphone records show former USCP chief Steven Sund requested National Guard support from the House sergeant-at-arms as early as 12:58pm on Jan. 6, but he did not receive approval until over an hour later.

Why it matters: Sund and former House sergeant-at-arms Paul Irving clashed at a Senate hearing on Tuesday over a dispute in the timeline for when Capitol Police requested the National Guard during the Capitol insurrection.

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