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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

An increasing number of COVID-19 cases among school-aged children across the U.S. throughout September may be linked to school reopenings and other community activities resuming.

Driving the news: The American Academy of Pediatrics reported this week that children of all ages make up 10% of U.S cases, up from 2% in April, per AP. As of Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counted more than 435,000 cases among children ages 0–17, and 93 deaths.

What they're saying: The CDC report did not indicate how children contracted the virus, but noted the timing coincides with school reopenings.

  • "Just as cases in college students have been linked to partying and bars, school children may be contracting the virus at playdates, sports and other activities where precautions aren’t being taken," Leana Wen, a public health specialist at George Washington University, said, per AP.
  • Twice as many teens were infected as younger children, the CDC report indicated. The agency acknowledged that may be an underestimate, because children with the coronavirus are tested less frequently given that they're often asymptomatic.

Where it stands: New York City, the nation’s largest school district with 1.1 million students, resumed in-person learning this Tuesday for elementary school children. Middle and high schools in the district are expected to open Thursday, two weeks after the original start date.

Go deeper

Fauci says COVID variants threaten some treatments more than vaccines

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The COVID-19 variants first detected in the U.K. and South Africa and now circulating globally aren't a current threat to the effectiveness of the first vaccines, but mutations will be closely monitored because "they could be an issue," NIAID director Anthony Fauci tells Axios.

The big picture: Vaccinations are underway, albeit with a slow start. The get-back-to-normal-goal depends on reaching 70%–85% herd immunity in the population, Fauci says. While there are some concerns the mutations might circumvent the vaccines, he says they pose more of a problem for certain treatments than for vaccines.

Fauci says vaccine rollout’s "bumps and hiccups” won’t last long

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: the Washington Post, Pool/Getty Images

Despite the slow roll out of vaccines so far, NIAID director Anthony Fauci says the COVID-19 vaccination campaign will ramp up fast enough that Americans should see "a degree of normality in the fall."

Driving the news: President-elect Biden is planning a program that will have "much more interaction between the federal government and the states than there are right now" in order to reach his goal of 1 million vaccines a day for 100 days, Fauci tells Axios.

Jan 7, 2021 - Health

China's Sinovac coronavirus vaccine 78% effective in Brazil trials

São Paulo Gov. Joao Doria holds a box of the CoronaVac vaccine during a press conference. Photo: Alexandre Schneider via Getty Images

A coronavirus vaccine produced by Chinese company Sinovac is 78% effective, Brazil officials announced Thursday.

Why it matters: Regulators in other countries are closely following the Phase 3 trials in Brazil. If the vaccine is approved for use, it could help fill a gap in access to coronavirus vaccines for many low- and middle-income countries.