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Cruise ship in Miami port. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A federal appeals court ruled Saturday night that the CDC can enforce its framework for cruise ships returning to operation, overturning an earlier district court ruling that would have made the CDC's guidelines mere suggestions.

Why it matters: The resumption of cruise ship activity has been a political flashpoint in Florida. The industry is worth billions of dollars for the state's economy and Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) has aggressively campaigned for its resumption.

State of play: DeSantis sued the CDC in April and last month U.S. District Judge Steven Merryday granted a temporary injunction against the CDC framework for cruise ships, per the Miami Herald.

  • At the time DeSantis cheered the ruling as a "victory for Florida families."

The big picture: By a 2-1 vote, the three-judge panel on the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals noted that the federal government had demonstrated "requisite showing" to obtain the stay order allowing the CDC regulations to remain in place, but did not elaborate further.

But, but, but: The state can appeal the order to the full circuit.

Go deeper

Updated Jul 16, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Biden calls on Congress to act after judge's ruling barring new DACA applicants

People hold signs during a rally in support of the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, in San Diego, California, June 18, 2020. Photo: Sandy Huffaker / AFP

A federal judge ruled on Friday that President Obama did not have the legal authority to create the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which offers protection from deportation for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

The latest: Calling the ruling "disappointing," President Biden on Saturday urged Congress to "ensure a permanent solution by granting a path to citizenship for Dreamers that will provide the certainty and stability that these young people need and deserve."

Robinhood IPO brings meme stock icon into the Wall Street fold

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today is the day everyone can begin buying and selling shares in Robinhood, which goes public on the New York Stock Exchange after raising $1.89 billion in its IPO.

Why it matters: Robinhood is considered a proxy for the rise of retail investing, particularly among younger Americans. But it also has drawn regulatory and political scrutiny for a variety of business practices, and found itself in the crosshairs after users drove up the price of GameStop stock earlier this year.

Study: Cost of carbon emissions measured in lives lost is high

Data: Our World in Data; Chart: Axios Visuals

Adding projected heat-related deaths into cost-benefit analysis of federal rules would tilt policymaking in favor of more aggressive carbon emissions cuts, a new study finds.

Why it matters: The social cost of carbon helps determine the outcome of cost-benefit analyses that underpin federal regulations. Adding in global warming's potential to cause more heat-related fatalities would tilt the policy calculus from supporting a gradual phaseout of emissions starting in 2050, to fully decarbonizing by the same year.