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People attend a rave in boats in Berlin's Kreuzberg district on May 31. Photo: David Gannon/AFP

A sudden surge in new cases in parts of Europe is jeopardizing the continent's progress in containing the coronavirus, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The big picture: Young people are going to bars and ignoring social-distancing rules, as authorities decry what they view as a lack of concern for older generations to whom the virus poses more risk, WSJ writes.

What's happening: Health authorities said the incidence rate for the coronavirus in France between July 20 and 25 for people age 20–29 was at 19.6 per 100,000 inhabitants, compared to 9.7 per 100,000 for the population as a whole.

  • The median age for new infections in Italy dropped to around 40 over the past month, compared to over 60 during the lockdown in April.
  • People ages 15–29 made up more than 27% of Spain's cases in July, compared to 6% at the end of March.

The bottom line: The uptick among young people catching the virus has lead to an overall spike in the number of new cases in some countries.

  • Germany has been recording around 900 new cases daily since last week, compared to its average of about 300 in April.
  • France has reported more than 1,000 daily cases, while Spain reports more than 2,000 new cases a day.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 10, 2020 - World

In photos: Coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

A waiter stands on an empty street in downtown Lisbon on Nov. 9, after Portugal introduced a night-time curfew for 70% of the population, including the capital and also the coastal city of Porto. It'll last for at least two weeks, per the BBC. Photo: Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

Portugal and Hungary have become the latest European countries to impose partial lockdowns, with curfews going into effect overnight. Governments across the continent are imposing more restrictions in attempts to curb COVID-19 spikes.

The big picture: Over 9.2 million cases have been reported to the European Centre for Disease Control. Per the ECDC, France has the most (almost 1.8 million) followed by Spain (over 1.3 million) and the United Kingdom (nearly 1.2 million). The COVID death rate per 100,000 of the population is highest in the Czech Republic (25), followed by Belgium (19) and Hungary (10.4).

Updated 12 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.
Nov 10, 2020 - Health

FDA grants emergency use authorization for Eli Lilly COVID-19 treatment

Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

The FDA announced on Monday it has issued an emergency use authorization for Eli Lilly's antibody therapy, bamlanivimab, to treat mild to moderate cases of COVID-19.

Why it matters: The treatment is authorized for people "who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19 and/or hospitalization," including people who are 65 and older, and/or people with certain chronic illnesses.