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A health care worker holds a COVID-19 vaccine at the Research Centers of America (RCA) in Hollywood, Florida on Aug. 13. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

51% of U.S. adults would "definitely or probably" get a coronavirus vaccine if the treatment were available today, while 49% would not, according to a Pew survey published Thursday.

Why it matters: All major political and demographic groups said they are less likely to get a COVID-19 vaccine since May, Pew finds, although Republicans and Black adults are least likely.

By the numbers: Intent to get a vaccine fell from 72% in May to 51%.

  • 58% of Democrats said they would probably or definitely be vaccinated, while 44% of Republicans said they would — a 14-percentage point divide.
  • 32% of Black adults said they would definitely or probably get a vaccine, compared to 52% of White adults, 56% of Hispanics and 72% of Asian Americans.

Between the lines: Worries about side effects and uncertainty as to how effective a vaccine would be were commonly cited in the survey as reasons for wanting to avoid a vaccine if one were available.

  • Of the 49% Americans who said they would not get vaccinated, 76% attributed that opinion to side effects.

The big picture: There are eight potential vaccines in late-stage trials right now, per Axios' Sam Baker, and the first could reach FDA review as early as October or November.

The bottom line: A coronavirus vaccine is needed to reinforce herd immunity, especially without a significant loss of life.

Methodology: Survey of 10,093 respondents from the Pew American Trends Panel conducted from Sept. 8 to Sept. 13. MOE ± 1.6 percentage points.

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Dec 25, 2020 - World

Chile becomes first South American country to start COVID vaccination

Nurse receiving the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in Santiago, Chile. Photo: David Lillo/Ministerio de Salud de Chile via Getty Images

Chile became the first country in South America to begin coronavirus vaccinations on Thursday after receiving its first 10,000 Pfizer-BioNTech doses, Reuters reports.

The big picture: The country bought 10 million doses from Pfizer-BioNTech and is expected to receive 240,000 doses in January, per Reuters.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.