May 11, 2020 - Health

Coronavirus reveals scary, unexpected symptoms

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Doctors continue to learn about more the scary and surprising symptoms of the coronavirus as the pandemic rages on, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The respiratory harm, as we all know, is very bad. But that's also what doctors and scientists were expecting to see when COVID-19 first emerged. They've also been taken aback by a raft of unexpected, harder-to-explain health effects.

  • In addition to coughing and a fever, potential symptoms are now believed to include, for some patients, a loss of smell, purple toes, pinkeye, vomiting and diarrhea.
  • And in addition to attacking patients' lungs, doctors now believe COVID-19 can cause strokes, kidney damage and problems with the immune system, and can weaken the muscles in the heart.
  • It also seems to be infecting more children than expected.

Between the lines: The virus appears to do major damage to blood cells, which likely helps explain why it's able to attack so many of the body's systems, and its damage to the heart in particular, the Post reports.

Related: Many doctors are now second-guessing the use of ventilators, because some coronavirus patients are able to function just fine even with oxygen levels so low that they should be unconscious, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Go deeper: The coronavirus is a moving target — and that has implications for a vaccine

Go deeper

18 hours ago - Health

Controlling the coronavirus in nursing homes won't be easy

Data: FREOPP.org; Map: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The structural issues that have plagued U.S. nursing homes for years will make it difficult for them to prevent coronavirus infections and deaths, even though we now understand the high-risk nature of the facilities.

Driving the news: Within the 80% of nursing homes that have reported coronavirus data to the federal government, nearly 26,000 residents died, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced yesterday.

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).