Lee Nak-yon (center R), South Korea's former prime minister and candidate of the ruling Democratic Party, shakes hands with Lee Hae-chan (center L), chairman of the ruling Democratic Party, at the National Assembly in Seoul on Wednesday. Photo: Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images

South Korean President Moon Jae-in's left-leaning ruling party won the largest majority of seats in 30 years in parliamentary elections on Wednesday, per the New York Times.

The big picture: The country's election marked the first national poll held worldwide since the novel coronavirus was declared a pandemic. Voters casting ballots in-person were required to wear face masks and have their temperatures checked, following record-high early voting participation, AP reports.

  • Over 10,500 people have contracted the virus as of Wednesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Over 7,600 people have recovered and 225 people have died.
South Korean election officials sort voting papers for ballot counting in a Seoul gymnasium. Photo: Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images
A woman has her temperature checked upon his arrival to cast her vote in Seoul. Photo: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images
Defector and former North Korean diplomat Thae Yong Ho secures a majority vote in his Gangnam constituency on behalf of the conservative United Future Party (UFP). Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images
South Korean citizens cast their votes in a polling station in Seoul. Photo: Jong Hyun Kim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
An official stands in a voting booth for people in self-quarantine. Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images
Voters wait in line in Seoul. Photo: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images
Lee Nak-yon (C front), South Korea's former prime minister and candidate of the ruling Democratic Party, and his party members watch televisions showing exit polls in Seoul. Photo: Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images
Voters wait in line at a polling station in Uiwang, South Korea. Photo: Simon Shin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Voters wait in line at a polling station in Seoul. Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images
South Koreans cast their ballots in Seoul. Photo: Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper: Countries grapple with how to hold elections during coronavirus

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally that they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.