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The coronavirus pandemic is exacerbating pre-existing problems with education equity in the United States, Common Sense Media CEO Jim Steyer said at an Axios event Tuesday.

Why it matters: A survey by Common Sense Media, an educational non-profit, found that black and Hispanic teens were more likely than white teens to say they were worried about falling behind in their studies as a result of in-person classes being canceled.

  • There is an additional online learning gap that has become even more obvious during the coronavirus, as 12 million children do not have at-home connectivity, Steyer said.

Yes, but: Steyer said that the coronavirus crisis also presents an opportunity to close that digital divide, noting that there are three ways he believes the U.S. can make "major strides" in confronting the issue: providing devices for all kids, increasing connectivity in their homes and ensuring they have access to high quality content.

The big picture: Steyer said he doesn't think a full virtual experience will ever replace classroom teaching, noting the importance of in-person relationships, but argued that "we're never going to go back to the same form of education that we had before the epidemic."

  • "I think we're going to see a blend of certain kinds of distance learning and online learning within class experiences," he said.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Aug 5, 2020 - Health

Chicago Public Schools to begin school year with fully remote classes

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Chicago Public Schools will start the next school year with fully remote classes, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Wednesday.

Why it matters: CPS is the third-largest public school district in the country, serving 361,000 students in over 600 schools. The move will likely avoid a possible strike from the city's teachers union, which had called for the school year to start remotely.

Reddit traders look to pummel Wall Street's old guard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Reddit traders are taking on Wall Street pros at their own game with this basic mantra: Stocks will always go up.

Why it matters: Their trades — egged on in Reddit threads — have played a role in historic market activity in recent days.

The week the Trump show ended

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Donald Trump was eclipsed in media attention last week by President Biden for the first time since Trump took office, according to viewership data on the internet, on social media and on cable news.

Why it matters: After Trump crowded out nearly every other news figure and topic for five years, momentum of the new administration took hold last week and the former president retreated, partly by choice and partly by being forced off the big platforms.