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Photo: Getty Images

The U.S. has seen far more deaths from heart disease during the coronavirus pandemic when compared to historical averages, according to a Washington Post analysis of federal data.

By the numbers: Five states hit the hardest in the pandemic's early days — Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey and New York — saw 8,300 more deaths from heart problems during March, April and May than usual, marking a 27% jump.

  • Those states had a combined 75,000 "excess deaths" over that period, and 17,000 were not directly attributed to coronavirus infections.
  • New York City was the epicenter of heart-linked excess deaths with more than 4,700.

The big picture: Emergency room visits for heart attacks fell by 23% in the 10 weeks following the declaration of a national emergency for the pandemic on March 13, per a CDC report.

  • They dropped by 20% for stroke and 10% for uncontrolled high blood sugar, a key symptom of diabetes, in that same timeframe.

Why it matters: It highlights a deadly facet of the pandemic that can often be overlooked. Patients with serious heart conditions may have died "as a result of delaying or not seeking care as the outbreak progressed and swamped some hospitals," per the Post.

Go deeper

Oct 9, 2020 - Health

Fauci: We had a superspreader event at the White House

Photo: Aeme Jennings/AFP via Getty Images

NIAID director Anthony Fauci told CBS News Radio on Friday that the "data speak for themselves," there was "a superspreader event at the White House."

Driving the news: Several people who attended the White House's Rose Garden celebration for the introduction of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett have tested positive for the coronavirus, including President Trump. Photos and video from the event show that few in attendance wore masks.

Trump says he's off coronavirus treatment medication

President Trump said he has been off coronavirus medication for at least eight hours, in his first televised event since his hospitalization for treatment of COVID-19.

Why it matters: Trump claimed on Fox News that he went to Walter Reed Medical Center because he felt tired and denied that he received supplemental oxygen because he had trouble breathing. White House physician Sean Conley said last week that the president received oxygen after his oxygen saturation level dropped below 94%.

Updated Oct 10, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Lindsey Graham refuses to take COVID test for Senate debate in SC

Graham talks with reporters in the Dirksen Senate Office Building. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) refused to take a COVID-19 test as demanded by his Democratic challenger, Jaime Harrison, forcing organizers of Friday's U.S. Senate debate to change the format at the last minute.

Why it matters: If Graham were to test positive for the virus it could delay confirmation hearings on Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.