Mar 24, 2020 - Health

Travelers from New York should quarantine for 14 days, White House says

Deborah Birx and President Trump on March 24. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus coordinator, said on Tuesday it was "very critical" that individuals who have recently traveled from the New York metro area self-quarantine for 14 days to mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: "We don't want that to be another seeding point to the rest of the country," Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at the coronavirus task force briefing on Tuesday.

Where it stands: There are at least 14,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in New York City and least 131 people have died, with more than 50 deaths located throughout the rest of the state.

  • The USNS Comfort — a floating hospital with nearly 1,000 hospital beds — will arrive in New York "in a few short weeks," Vice President Mike Pence said.
  • "We're talking to them about it," Trump said on Tuesday, when a reporter asked if the task force had notified New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo about its recommendation that travelers from New York self-isolate for 14 days.

Go deeper: Trump's huge coronavirus gamble

Go deeper

10 hours ago - Health

Fauci: "My meetings with the president have been dramatically decreased"

Anthony Fauci with President Trump on May 15. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview with Stat News that his meetings with President Trump about the coronavirus have "dramatically decreased."

The big picture: Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease doctor and a key member of the White House's coronavirus task force, said he "was meeting with [the president] four times a week back, a month or so ago."

Updated 6 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

Health experts fear that the protests breaking out across the U.S. could contribute to the spread of the coronavirus.

The state of play: Being outside may limit the danger, but close quarters, yelling, and potential exposure to tear gas, which causes coughing and crying, increase the risk of spread. It's recommended that those who are protesting be tested for the coronavirus.

Coronavirus still has a foothold in the South

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Overall, new coronavirus infections in the U.S. are on the decline. But a small handful of states, mainly clustered in the South, aren't seeing any improvement.

The big picture: Our progress, nationwide, is of course good news. But it's fragile progress, and it’s not universal. Stubborn pockets of infection put lives at risk, and they can spread, especially as state lockdowns continue to ease.