Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Caring for older adults was already expensive, emotionally taxing and logistically difficult — and the coronavirus is only making it worse.

Why it matters: People older than 65 have the highest risk of dying from the virus, and outbreaks have been rampant in long-term care facilities. That is creating anxiety for seniors and their families.

The big picture: Most seniors will need at least some long-term care, but the coronavirus has added even more complications to the tough decisions about how to obtain it.

  • Assisted-living and independent-living facilities cost an average of at least $4,000 a month, almost always paid out of pocket.
  • Nursing homes are generally more affordable, but people often have to burn through their savings, pensions and other assets on their way there.
  • Nursing homes also are cramped, understaffed and have poor track records with infection control to begin with — and they've been hotbeds for the spread of the coronavirus.
  • Home care is another option. If a professional worker isn’t available, the task often depends on the charity of a friend or relative, and that's a dicier proposition when those friends or relatives could be carrying the virus — or unemployed, caring for children or otherwise just not able to help.

Where it stands: The pandemic has severely hindered operations across the industry.

  • Senior housing operators have limited tours of rooms and communities to prospective residents and one family member, or they are only providing virtual tours. That limited recruitment, combined with widespread outbreaks and lockdowns, has led to fewer people moving in.
  • The federal government is starting to ease some restrictions at nursing homes, but is saying they "should be among the last to reopen within the community."

Controlling outbreaks depends on facilities stocking up equipment for employees and conducting widespread testing — things the industry hasn't exactly been heralded for.

Between the lines: Seniors who want to avoid the virus-related risks could try to stay and get care at their homes, which more people have done in recent years. Adult children also may try to move their parents closer to their homes.

  • "But not all parents want to do that," said Toby Edelman, a senior policy attorney with the Center for Medicare Advocacy.
  • Home health aides can also be hard to find. Despite the demand, the job pays poverty-level wages.

The bottom line: "Especially with the way [the coronavirus] has spread at these facilities, there's going to be a fear until there's trust that the risks are sufficiently low," said Carri Chan, a health care business professor at Columbia University.

Go deeper: The looming crisis in long-term care

Go deeper

Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday July 24, 2019. Photo: The Washington Post / Contributor

Former special counsel Robert Mueller responded to claims from President Trump and his allies that Roger Stone was a "victim" in the Justice Department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, writing in a Washington Post op-ed published Saturday: "He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so."

Why it matters: The rare public comments by Mueller come on the heels of President Trump's move to commute the sentence of his longtime associate, who was sentenced in February to 40 months in prison for crimes stemming from the Russia investigation. The controversial decision brought an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars.

Trump dons face mask during Walter Reed visit

Trump wearing a face mask in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on July 11. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump wore a face mask during his Saturday visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, according to AP.

Why it matters: This is the first known occasion the president has appeared publicly with a facial covering as recommended by health officials since the coronavirus pandemic began, AP writes.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 12,607,510 — Total deaths: 562,338 — Total recoveries — 6,948,863Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 3,228,884 — Total deaths: 134,600 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,919,421Map.
  3. Public health: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter: "Please wear a mask to save lives" Fauci hasn't briefed Trump on the coronavirus pandemic in at least two months — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  4. Food: How the coronavirus pandemic boosted alternative meat.
  5. Sports: Charge of "money grab" by college football.
  6. World: India reimposes lockdowns as coronavirus cases soar.