Adapted from Rystad Energy; Chart: Axios Visuals

Air travel — and the jet fuel powering it — are plummeting alongside most other parts of our modern economy as vast swaths of the world shut down to fight the coronavirus.

The big picture: Data that has newly become available shows the dramatic impact of global shutdowns, which will reverberate across the livelihoods of people working in these sectors.

By the numbers:

  • Global oil demand for jet fuel has evaporated to 35% of normal levels in April and May, consultancy Rystad Energy projected Wednesday.
  • The U.S. Transportation Security Administration screened a record low 97,130 people at airport checkpoints on Tuesday, compared to more than 2 million this time last year, a TSA spokeswoman said on Twitter.

What we're watching: Rystad predicts that jet fuel demand will gradually pick back up, but by December will still be far lower than pre-coronavirus levels.

Go deeper: Coronavirus fuels huge drop in gasoline demand

Go deeper

Updated Jul 31, 2020 - Health

The states where face coverings are mandatory

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Face masks will be required in Vermont's public areas starting Aug. 1 where social distancing is not possible, the state's health department announced.

The big picture: More than 30 states, in addition to the District of Columbia, have issued some form of mask mandate as new infections surge across the country.

Updated 3 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates: Global cases top 18 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The number of novel coronavirus cases surged past 18 million globally on Sunday night, Johns Hopkins data shows.

By the numbers: More than 688,300 people have died from COVID-19 worldwide. Over 10.6 million have recovered.

Virtual school is another setback for struggling retail industry

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A virtual school year will likely push retailers even closer to the brink.

Why it matters: Back-to-school season is the second-biggest revenue generating period for the retail sector, after the holidays. But retailers say typical shopping sprees will be smaller with students learning at home — another setback for their industry, which has seen a slew of store closures and bankruptcy filings since the pandemic hit.